Category: All Posts

Watch the livestream of the Library Publishing Forum | Library Publishing Coalition

From the Library Publishing Coalition:

For the second time, we will be livestreaming portions of the Library Publishing Forum (5/22-23)! You can see which sessions will be streamed on the Program Page (look for the little camera icon next to the presentation title). All streaming will be done via LPC’s Twitter account and will be shared via the conference hashtag: #LPForum18. Can’t watch the stream live? Links to the recordings will be added to the program after the conference.

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Source: Watch the livestream of the Library Publishing Forum | Library Publishing Coalition

But what about copyright? | OCLC Distinguished Seminar Series

OCLC presents this seminar from Melissa Levine, Lead Copyright Officer at the University of Michigan Library. You many join virtually or in-person at 11:00 am Eastern on Tuesday, May 22.

As we think intentionally about issues of diversity, equity, inclusion, we recognize how free, open online collections make it possible for everyone to study primary evidence regarding race, religion, gender, national origin, indigenous peoples and more. But copyright touches almost all aspects of the work of libraries, museums, and archives. It affects what gets produced and how, what gets collected and preserved, who gets to see or use collections, and how they can be used. Copyright shapes what we are able to share online, whether they are in accessible formats, and raises questions about how to meaningfully support use and reuse.

Read more and register here:

Source: But what about copyright?

How OpenStax Books are Made | Blog – OpenStax

From Anthony Palmiotto writing for the OpenStax Blog:

Our editorial director describes the process, from author recruitment to review to publication.  “So how do you make these books?” We get this question almost every day. While we’re always happy to answer it, and value the resulting discussions and suggestions, we thought it would be helpful to share a general overview of our development process.Our earliest research efforts, circa 2011-12, involved speaking to hundreds of instructors to determine the initial criteria for textbook adoption – what it took to make the “short list.” While the answers varied, there were some common themes:

  • general alignment to the topical coverage and sequence of the course
  • evidence of a strong faculty review process
  • typical elements of a textbook in one’s discipline

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Source: Blog – OpenStax

More institutions consider ending their ‘big deals’ with publishers | Inside Higher Ed

From Lindsay McKenzie writing for Inside Higher Ed:

An increasing number of universities are ending, or threatening to end, bundled journal subscriptions with major publishers. Florida State University recently announced plans to cancel its “big deal” with Elsevier, but it is far from the first university to do so. In recent years, there has been an uptick in the number of reports of libraries dropping their bundled journal deals with big publishers, which can cost upward of $1 million annually.

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Source: More institutions consider ending their ‘big deals’ with publishers

Librarians as Open Education Leaders: Responsibilities and Possibilities | TU Delft Repositories

From the proceedings of the Open Education Global Conference 2018:

A common claim in open education is that librarians are effective supporters in open education work because their talents for research, organization, and working with students make them natural supporters of faculty designing OER courses. This study seeks to understand how librarians and faculty interacted with one another in an deliberate cooperation in course design. Seventeen faculty-librarian partnerships were awarded $3000 stipends to cooperate in designing open courses. Each participant kept a weekly journal describing current contributions to the course project. Early findings from analysis of the journals shows that librarians are effective supporters, but careful planning and organization of the projects was very necessary for the collaborations to be successful.

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Source: Librarians as Open Education Leaders: Responsibilities and Possibilities | TU Delft Repositories

A New Study Found OER to Match and Even Outperform a Commercial Textbook | eLearningInside News

From Henry Kronk writing for eLearningInside News:

A new study conducted by researchers at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in British Columbia, Canada examines the performance of students using open education resources (OER) in both print and digital formats compared to a traditional textbook from a commercial publisher. The study found that students using OER spent less time overall studying for the class while scoring comparably with those who used a commercially published textbook.

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Source: A New Study Found OER to Match and Even Outperform a Commercial Textbook | eLearningInside News

Harder to Find than Nemo: The Elusive Image Citation Standard | Weinraub | College & Research Libraries

New image citation standards need to be developed for college and graduate students to meet visual literacy standards. The MLA Handbook, 8th edition, and Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition, do not adequately clarify how to caption, attribute, and cite images. Other image captioning and citing resources are available, but they refer to the MLA and Chicago manuals. Image captions from scholarly journals vary widely and cannot be used as examples for students to follow. Recommendations are also provided for future editions of the MLA Handbook and Chicago Manual of Style.

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Source: Harder to Find than Nemo: The Elusive Image Citation Standard | Weinraub | College & Research Libraries

A Mass of Copyrighted Works Will Soon Enter the Public Domain | The Atlantic

From the Glenn Fleishman at The Atlantic:

The Great American Novel enters the public domain on January 1, 2019—quite literally. Not the concept, but the book by William Carlos Williams. It will be joined by hundreds of thousands of other books, musical scores, and films first published in the United States during 1923. It’s the first time since 1998 for a mass shift to the public domain of material protected under copyright. It’s also the beginning of a new annual tradition: For several decades from 2019 onward, each New Year’s Day will unleash a full year’s worth of works published 95 years earlier.

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Source: A Mass of Copyrighted Works Will Soon Enter the Public Domain – The Atlantic

Digital Publishing: A Home for Faculty in the Library — Exercises in Innovation from Harvard Law School

From Claire DeMarco & Kyle Courtney at Harvard Law School via the Idealis:

This article highlights specific examples of desire by faculty at Harvard Law School to push legal scholarship beyond the constraints of traditional commercial publishing. Harvard Law School Library, like any other academic library, is navigating the expansion of scholarly formats to the digital realm, as well as the demand by faculty to support new, and evolving, approaches to scholarship. Analysis of these examples will focus on the unique role that the library has in stimulating, supporting, and sustaining, faculty publishing efforts, in addition to the challenges presented by the new, and potentially uncomfortable, proposition of library as a digital publisher.

Source: Digital Publishing: A Home for Faculty in the Library — Exercises in Innovation from Harvard Law School