Category: Affordable Education

Differentiating Between Open Access and Open Educational Resources | VTechWorks

From Anita Walz:

Preview:

Differentiating open access and open educational resource can be a challenge in some contexts. Excellent resources such as “How Open Is It?: A Guide for Evaluating the Openness of Journals” (CC BY) https://sparcopen.org/our-work/howopenisit created by SPARC, PLOS, and OASPA greatly aid us in understanding the relative openness of journals. However, visual resources to conceptually differentiate open educational resources (OER) from resources disseminated using an open access approach do not currently exist. Until now.
This one page introductory guide differentiates OER and OA materials on the basis of purpose (teaching vs. research), method of access (analog and digital), and in terms of the relative freedoms offered by different levels of Creative Commons licenses, the most common open license. Many other open licenses, including open software licenses also exist.

Continue reading here:

Source: Differentiating Between Open Access and Open Educational Resources

SPARC Releases Connect OER Annual Report for 2018-2019 – SPARC

From SPARC:

Preview:

SPARC is pleased to release our 2018-2019 Connect OER Annual Report, which offers insights about OER activities across North America. This year’s report examines the current state of OER activities featuring data from 132 institutions in the U.S. and Canada. Our intent is that these insights will help inform SPARC members, open education advocates, and the library community about current trends, best practices, and the collective impact being achieved through OER at participating institutions. Click here to download the report.

Continue reading here:

Source: SPARC Releases Connect OER Annual Report for 2018-2019 – SPARC

Teaching and Learning Without a Textbook: Undergraduate Student Perceptions of Open Educational Resources| International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning

From Hong Lin in International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning:

Abstract:

Given the upsurge of textbook costs, college students increasingly expect universities and instructors to offer alternatives to traditional textbooks. One textbook alternative is using open educational resources (OER). While OER unquestionably save students money, the question remains whether the adoption of OER (instructional materials) is aligned with open pedagogy (methods). This study investigated 46 undergraduate students’ perceptions of using only OER in an introductory course in a large American public university. As reported by study participants, advantages of using OER include textbook cost savings, access to dynamic and plentiful OER materials, that OER enabling mobile learning, and that OER foster the development of self-directed skills and copyright guidelines. Challenges reported include lacking a tactile sense with OER, slow Internet connections, unclear instruction and guidance, and insufficient self-regulation skills. Course design and implementation
considerations were discussed.

Continue reading here:
Source: Teaching and Learning Without a Textbook: Undergraduate Student Perceptions of Open Educational Resources| International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning

Open educational resources, student efficacy, and user perceptions: a synthesis of research published between 2015 and 2018 | Educational Technology Research and Development

From John Hilton in Educational Technology Research and Development:

Abstract:

Although textbooks are a traditional component in many higher education contexts, their increasing price have led many students to forgo purchasing them and some faculty to seek substitutes. One such alternative is open educational resources (OER). This present study synthesizes results from sixteen efficacy and twenty perceptions studies involving 121,168 students or faculty that examine either (1) OER and student efficacy in higher education settings or (2) the perceptions of college students and/or instructors who have used OER. Results across these studies suggest students achieve the same or better learning outcomes when using OER while saving significant amounts of money. The results also indicate that the majority of faculty and students who have used OER had a positive experience and would do so again.

Continue reading here:

Source: Open educational resources, student efficacy, and user perceptions: a synthesis of research published between 2015 and 2018 | SpringerLink

Blurring Lines — Considering the Future of Discovery, Access and Business Models in Support of Virtual Reality Content for Scholarly Research and Classroom Learning:  What Can We Learn from the Rise of OER and OA?  – Against The Grain

From David Parker in Against the Grain:in:

Preview:

The open educational resources (OER) movement began in the years between 1999 and 2002, during which time Rice launched its precursor to OpenStax and UNESCO’S 2002 forum on open courseware coined the term OER.; Since these early days the pace of growth in adoption of OER, while unsatisfying to some activists, has been, in my view, phenomenal. Studies, such as Opening the Textbook by Julia E. Seaman and Jeff Seaman from the Babson Survey Research Group, reported in 2017 that the OER adoption rate for large enrollment courses was 16.5%.  And when I attended OpenEd 18 this past fall in Niagara Falls, New York, I was astounded by the number of attendees and, most specifically, by the numbers of librarians in formal or informal support roles for OER at their institutions.

Continue reading here:

Source: v31 #3 Blurring Lines — Considering the Future of Discovery, Access and Business Models in Support of Virtual Reality Content for Scholarly Research and Classroom Learning:  What Can We Learn from the Rise of OER and OA?  – Against The Grain

Q&A: Cengage/McGraw-Hill Merger – SPARC

From Nicole Allen in SPARC News:

Preview:

Over the past year, one of SPARC’s top priorities has been tracking the evolution of the academic publishing industry and its implications for the future of research and education. The urgency of the issues outlined in our Landscape Analysis was put into sharp relief in May, when Cengage and McGraw-Hill—the second and third largest college textbook publishers—announced plans to merge. If approved by federal regulators, the merger would reshape the U.S. higher education course material market as a duopoly—with potentially dire consequences in terms of price, access, and control of student data.

Shortly after the merger was announced, SPARC began to explore avenues for taking action. Over the past two months, we’ve been working with industry and antitrust experts to build arguments against the merger, which we intend to file with the Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division. While we acknowledge that the current regulatory environment makes opposing any merger an uphill battle, we think that this is an important opportunity to educate antitrust enforcers about the unique challenges presented by the textbook market, and especially the implications of the growing control of academic publishers over key higher education infrastructure.

Continue reading here:

Source: Q&A: Cengage/McGraw-Hill Merger – SPARC

Guest Post – Library Publishers Convene in Vancouver to Discuss Open Platforms and Open Educational Resources – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Heather Staines in The Scholarly Kitchen:

Preview:

From May 8 to 10th of this year, about two hundred librarians, publishers, and all flavors in between gathered at Simon Fraser University (SFU) in Vancouver for the 6th annual Library Publishing Coalition Forum. The Pre-Conference on Wednesday, May 8th, focused on Open Educational Resources, had about 90 attendees. The open theme carried over into the main event with presentations on open publishing platforms of many kinds.

Increased interest in open platforms and open tools has grown after continuing industry consolidation of hosting and authoring tools — namely, Wiley’s acquisition of the Atypon platform and the latter’s subsequent purchase of the Authoria and Manuscript tools, along with Elsevier’s shift in emphasis on the researcher workflow with acquisitions of the Mendeley Scholarly Collaboration Network, Aries’ Editorial Manager, and the institutional repository provider, Bepress. Many posts here in the Scholarly Kitchen have focused on this trend and highlighted concern of vendor lock-in, as well as smaller publisher concerns of being “locked out.”

Continue reading here:
Source: Guest Post – Library Publishers Convene in Vancouver to Discuss Open Platforms and Open Educational Resources – The Scholarly Kitchen

Open Educational Resource (OER) Adoption in Higher Education: Examining Institutional Perspectives| FDLA Journal

From Rebekah E. Wright and Jennifer L. Reeves in FDLA Journal:

Abstract:

The costs associated with education, including tuition and learning resources, continue to rise causing affordability issues for learners. It has been reported that the cost of traditional textbooks and materials has risen by as much as 103% over the past decade (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2018). Due to this increase, many students have opted out of purchasing required textbooks for classes. A study conducted in Florida found that 67% of students did not purchase required textbooks (Florida Virtual Campus, 2016). Institutions of Higher Education are becoming increasingly concerned with textbook affordability and the impact on academic performance, achievement, and completion (Jhangiani, Dastur, LeGrand, & Penner, 2018). These institutions have begun delving deeper into the issues associated with textbook affordability and seeking ways to reverse the negative effects experienced by learners due to rising textbook costs.

The implementation of open educational resources (OER) may be the solution, however, the impact of these resources is still undefined. OERs are being examined as cost-effective substitutions to traditional textbooks and literature suggests that OERs are equally effective and are comparable in quality to traditional textbooks (Hilton, n.d.). Current literature recommends further exploration concerning stakeholder perspectives of OER adoption and integration as well as examining the impact of OERs across educational institutions globally. A case study conducted at a state college in Florida sought to examine the perspectives of a group of four identified stakeholder groups (i.e., faculty, librarians, instructional designers, and students) in order to better understand the impact of these OERs at the institutional level (Wright, 2018).

Continue reading here:
Source: “Open Educational Resource (OER) Adoption in Higher Education: Examinin” by Rebekah E. Wright and Jennifer L. Reeves

UNESCO OER Recommendation: One Step Closer to Adoption – Creative Commons

From Cable Green in the Creative Commons Blog:

Preview:

The global open education community works collectively to create a world in which everyone has universal access to effective open education resources (OER) and meaningful learning opportunities as defined by the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goal #4 (SDG4): Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all. UNESCO continues to work with national governments to help them better support open education (content, practices, policy) in their countries. CC is an active leader and contributor to this work, alongside our many partners.

On May 28, 2019, UNESCO member state representatives took an important step for open education by adopting the 2019 UNESCO OER Recommendation, providing unanimous approval to bring it to the next General Assembly. UNESCO has a strong history in open education, having coined the term OER in 2002, passed the 2012 Paris OER Declaration, and co-hosted (with Slovenia) the 2017 OER Global Congress.

Continue reading here:

Source: UNESCO OER Recommendation: One Step Closer to Adoption – Creative Commons

Understanding the Impact of OER: Achievements and Challenges – UNESCO IITE

From UNESCO Institute for Information Technologies in Education:

Preview:

The publication “Understanding the Impact of OER: Achievements and Challenges” is the result of partnership between the UNESCO Institute for Information Technologies in Education (UNESCO IITE) and OER Africa, an initiative established by Saide.

It critically reviews the growth of open educational resources (OER) and its potential impact on education systems around the world; and points at some significant achievements as well as key challenges hindering the growth and potential of OER that need to be addressed.

Continue reading here:

Source: Understanding the Impact of OER: Achievements and Challenges – UNESCO IITE