Category: Affordable Education

The Rebus Guide to Publishing Open Textbooks (So Far) – Simple Book Publishing

From Apurva Ashok and Zoe Wake Hyde:

“The Rebus Guide to Publishing Open Textbooks (So Far) is a living repository of collective knowledge, written to equip all those who want to publish open textbooks with the resources they need. Representing two years of collaboration, innumerable conversations and exchanges, and a wide range of collective knowledge and experience, the Guide is a book-in-progress and will evolve and grow over time. Join the project discussion and help shape its development!”

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Source: The Rebus Guide to Publishing Open Textbooks (So Far) – Simple Book Publishing

Format Shift: Information Behavior and User Experience in the Academic E-book Environment | Tracy | Reference & User Services Quarterly

From Daniel G. Tracy via Reference & User Services Quarterly:

Abstract:

“This article seeks to understand information behavior in the context of the academic e-book user experience, shaped by a disparate set of vendor platforms licensed by libraries. These platforms vary in design and affordances, yet studies of e-book use in an academic context often treat e-books as a unified phenomenon in opposition to print books. Based on participant diaries tracking e-book information behavior and follow-up interviews and focus groups on troubleshooting and format shifting behaviors, this study seeks to provide a deep qualitative look at decisions that academic users make about formats when encountering e-books. It identifies reasons for noted disparities between stated user preferences for print books while often using e-books instead. It also demonstrates the importance of considering e-books as a set of formats, rather than a unified experience, when evaluating e-book platforms or providing information services around a set of platforms. While e-book studies often point to a distinction between “use” of e-books and “reading” of print books by users, this study shows much more willingness to both use and read e-books for some tasks if platforms allow for offloading reading of content to preferred reading devices and apps. This has implications for collection development, advocacy with vendors, and for marketing to or consulting with users about e-book access and use options.”

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Source: Format Shift: Information Behavior and User Experience in the Academic E-book Environment | Tracy | Reference & User Services Quarterly

Survey of faculty views of technology explores online teaching, OER, assessment | Inside Higher Ed

From Doug Lederman via Inside Higher Ed:

“The proportion of college instructors who are teaching online and blended courses is growing. So is their support for using technology to deliver instruction.  But their belief in the quality and effectiveness of online courses and digital technology isn’t keeping pace.  Those are among the findings — conflicting and confounding, as is often the case — of Inside Higher Ed’s 2018 Survey of Faculty Attitudes on Technology, published today in partnership with Gallup.”

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Source: Survey of faculty views of technology explores online teaching, OER, assessment

Bridging the Chasm: Faculty Support Roles for Academic Librarians in the Adoption of Open Educational Resources | Braddlee | College & Research Libraries

Fro Dr. Braddlee, Amy VanScoy via College & Research Libraries

Abstract
Despite demonstrated student benefits from Open Educational Resources (OER), especially those in community colleges, faculty adoption remains marginal. This study is framed by diffusion of innovations theory, which acknowledges adoption of an innovation must exceed a tipping point to ensure enduring success. The study focuses on community college faculty with demonstrated OER engagement, on the basis that these faculty have greater likelihood to adopt OER and help “bridge the chasm”. In surveying faculty, we tested a range of roles librarians have played in supporting OER adoption. Findings show that faculty value librarians’ roles in discovery, cataloging, and information literacy, but are less open to librarians operating outside these traditional roles, including mentoring and policy development. Faculty were supportive of librarians’ role in advocacy for OER and overall felt that librarians have a role to play in the OER movement on their campuses.

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Source: Bridging the Chasm: Faculty Support Roles for Academic Librarians in the Adoption of Open Educational Resources | Braddlee | College & Research Libraries

Getting Started: Open Textbook Network Publishing Cooperative

From the OTN:

“More and more, there is interest in supporting faculty authors in creating open textbooks for higher education. This course is designed to be pragmatic support for open textbook publishing programs, often led by librarians. Instructional designers, technologists and people who work at university presses may also be involved.

You’re invited to move through this course in whatever way works best for you. That said, it is organized in what we think is a sensible chronological order. So, if you’re not sure where to start, start at the beginning!”

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Source: Getting Started: Open Textbook Network Publishing Cooperative