Category: Affordable Education

Open Educational Resources – Babson Survey Research Group

From the Babson Survey Research Group, the third annual report in this series:

Responses from over 2,700 U.S. faculty paint both a “Good news” and a “Bad news” picture for the role of open educational resources (OER) in U.S. higher education.
The levels of awareness of OER, the licensing tied to it, and overall adoption of OER materials, remains low. Only 10% of faculty reported that they were “Very aware” of open educational resources, with 20% saying that they were “Aware.” Faculty continue to report significant barriers to OER adoption. The most serious issues continue to be the effort needed to find and evaluate suitable material.

Read more here:

Source: Open Educational Resources – Babson Survey Research Group

States mandate OER and affordable textbook labeling, but challenges remain | Inside Higher Ed

From Mark Lieberman via Inside Higher Ed:

Four states — California, Oregon, Texas and Washington — have in recent years passed legislation requiring institutions to add labels in course schedules and online registration systems for courses that use free textbooks or open educational resources (OER). Scattered institutions outside those four states have begun this process as well.

Read more here:
Source: States mandate OER and affordable textbook labeling, but challenges remain

Dec 6: Adjunct Faculty’s Essential Role in OER Adoption and Degrees – CCCOER

A free webinar from CCCOER:

Join us for this webinar to hear how adjunct faculty can participate and be acknowledged for the essential role that they are playing in developing OER degree pathways at many colleges.

Read more and register here:

Source: Dec 6: Adjunct Faculty’s Essential Role in OER Adoption and Degrees – CCCOER

v29 #4 Community-Led Teaching and Learning: Designing an Open Educational Resource for Scholarly Communication and Legal Issues | Against The Grain

From Josh Bolick,  Maria Bonn, and Will Cross via Against the Grain:

The open educational resources (OER) movement is growing at a rapid pace — not as rapidly as prices for textbooks have risen over the course of the last decades, and not rapidly enough to yet meet the exigent needs of students, many of whom take educational risks to alleviate costs by forgoing required materials.1  As discussed in last year’s Against the Grain special issue,2 in order to support those students, libraries and librarians have become staunch advocates for open education and open textbooks.  Yet, our community often still relies upon commercial textbooks for our own professionalization.  This is especially true for legal issues like copyright and privacy, which — when they are offered at all — often borrow textbooks that reflect the overpriced nature of law school textbook prices.

Read more here:
Source: v29 #4 Community-Led Teaching and Learning: Designing an Open Educational Resource for Scholarly Communication and Legal Issues | Against The Grain

Open Education: From Resources to Practice – ANU Online Coffee Courses

A short online course from Australian National University:

During Open Education Week in March this year, the coffee course ‘Open Educational Practice: An Introduction’, introduced OER and some of the foundational considerations to ‘adopting’ open education. In this upcoming course, you’ll explore some of the deeper issues surrounding open education; specifically, practical decisions and questions that should be asked when developing, reusing, and collaborating on open education activities. Each day the facilitators will provide stimulus for reflection and group discussion, as well as a synthesis of the previous days’ discussion.

Read more here:
Source: Open Education: From Resources to Practice – ANU Online Coffee Courses

DPLA Exchange Offers Library-Centered Ebook Marketplace – DPLA

By DPLA Interim Executive Director Michele Kimpton, Ebook Consultant Micah May, and Ebook Program Manager Michelle Bickert

The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) is proud to unveil a pilot program to test a new model for a library-owned and library-centered ebook marketplace for popular ebooks, together with free public domain and openly-licensed ebooks. The DPLA Exchange (exchange.dp.la), will allow staff at six pilot libraries to log in and start selecting ebooks from over a hundred thousand licensed titles and thousands more that are openly-licensed.  The new program will be administered through a partnership with LYRASIS, which will provide the hosting and other technology resources.

Read more here:

Source: Digital Public Library of America » Blog Archive » DPLA Exchange Offers Library-Centered Ebook Marketplace

Introduction to Open Education | edX

This MOOC started this week from David Wiley and George Siemens, and it’s been very interesting so far! A good introduction to all the issues surrounding open education:

Learn about open education and how it can significantly reduce costs, increase agency and transparency, and improve learning outcomes.

Register here:

Source: Introduction to Open Education | edX

The Affordable College Textbook Act – SPARC

From SPARC, legislation introduced today:

The Affordable College Textbook Act seeks to reduce the cost of textbooks at U.S. colleges and universities by expanding the use of open textbooks (and other Open Educational Resources) that everyone can use, adapt and share freely. The legislation was introduced on September 26, 2017 by Representatives Polis (D-CO) and Sinema (D-AZ) in the House and  Senators Durbin (D-IL), Franken (D-MN), and King (I-ME) in the Senate.

Read more here:

Source: The Affordable College Textbook Act – SPARC

Reasons to Open Source Your Syllabus – Chronicle of Higher Education

From Anastasia Salter via the Chronicle of Higher Education:

This semester I’m teaching a new graduate course prep. I always enjoy putting together a new syllabus, but graduate courses are particularly exciting: I always have more things I want to teach than can possibly fit into a semester. During my summer planning, I read and reread articles and gather possible materials, and consult the best reference of all: everybody else’s syllabus.

 

Read more here:

Source: Reasons to Open Source Your Syllabus

OER: The Future of Education Is Open – Educause Review

From

Last March, activists in the Open Educational Resources (OER) movement and representatives of the publishing industry debated with each other at the 2017 SXSW EDU Conference and Festival. When the dust settled, the two sides agreed on two things: (1) the textbook publishing market is “broken,” and (2) the future of courseware will be increasingly digital.

Read more here:
Source: OER: The Future of Education Is Open | EDUCAUSE, EDUCAUSE Review 52, no. 5 (September/October 2017)