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DPLA receives $1.5 million grant from Alfred P. Sloan Foundation | DPLA

From DPLA:

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“The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) is pleased to announce that the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation has awarded DPLA a $1.5 million grant. The grant will enable DPLA to expand its efforts to provide an improved ebook experience for patrons through their libraries, building on its cultural heritage aggregation program.”
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Source: DPLA receives $1.5 million grant from Alfred P. Sloan Foundation | DPLA

Editorial Mutiny at Elsevier Journal | Inside Higher Ed

From Lindsay McKenzie via Inside Higher Ed:

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“The entire editorial board of the Elsevier-owned Journal of Informetrics resigned Thursday in protest over high open-access fees, restricted access to citation data and commercial control of scholarly work.

Today, the same team is launching a new fully open-access journal called Quantitative Science Studies. The journal will be for and by the academic community and will be owned by the International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics (ISSI). It will be published jointly with MIT Press.”

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Source: Elsevier journal editors resign, start rival open-access journal

The Quest to Topple Science-Stymying Academic Paywalls | WIRED

From Joi Ito via Wired:

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“SCIENCE IS BUILT, enhanced, and developed through the open and structured sharing of knowledge. Yet some publishers charge so much for subscriptions to their academic journals that even the libraries of the world’s wealthiest universities such as Harvard are no longer able to afford the prices. Those publishers’ profit margins rival those of the most profitable companies in the world, even though research is largely underwritten by governments, and the publishers don’t pay authors and researchers or the peer reviewers who evaluate those works. How is such an absurd structure able to sustain itself—and how might we change it?”

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Source: The Quest to Topple Science-Stymying Academic Paywalls | WIRED

Large Scale Publisher Survey reveals Global Trends in Open Access Publishing – News Service

From the DOAJ News Service:

“A survey of publishers with journals indexed in DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals) has revealed surprising trends in the way that content is published; what types of organisations are publishing the content; on how publishing standards are being accepted globally; and geographical trends on the uptake of open access.

The survey was sent out by DOAJ to its 6000+ account holders, that is to say publishers, in the Summer of 2018. Account holders were allowed one response each, regardless of how many journals they have in that account and all accounts have at least 1 journal active in DOAJ. The total number of responses returned was 1065. Answers revealed some interesting facts, especially when compared to answers provided in the last publisher survey carried out in 2013.”

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Source: Large Scale Publisher Survey reveals Global Trends in Open Access Publishing – News Service

Professors Worry About the Cost of Textbooks, but Free Alternatives Pose Their Own Problems – The Chronicle of Higher Education

From Beth McMurtrie via The Chronicle of Higher Education:

“When it comes to textbooks, faculty members have a lot of feelings. Many of them negative. But their thoughts on digital coursework and openly licensed materials aren’t any less conflicted.

These opinions, found in “Freeing the Textbook: Educational Resources in U.S. Higher Education, 2018,” a survey of more than 4,000 faculty members and department chairs released Wednesday, paint a complex picture of a fast-changing landscape, one in which instructors and students have more options about course materials than ever before, yet the best path forward remains unclear.”

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Source: Professors Worry About the Cost of Textbooks, but Free Alternatives Pose Their Own Problems – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Volume 6, General Issue: All content available | Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication

From Mark Newton and Melanie Schlosser, Editors-in-Chief, Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication:

“The Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication (JLSCVolume 6 General Issue is now complete. JLSC invites new submissions to the journal – please see the author guidelines for details.”

Table of Contents

Editorial

Commentary

Research Articles

Practice Articles

Brief Reviews of Books and Products

Source: Volume 6, General Issue: All content available | Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication

Community Code: Supporting the Mission of Open Access and Preservation with the Use of Open Source Library Technologies | Florida State University Libraries

From Keila Zayas-Ruiz and Mark Baggett via Florida State University Libraries:

“As librarians, we serve as champions for equal access and preservation of materials, both scholarly and cultural in significance. One of the core missions of libraries is access. Due to increased demand for scholarly articles and the technological advances of the internet, open access is quickly becoming a major priority among research libraries today. It “has expanded the possibilities for disseminating one’s own research and accessing that of others.” The movement of open access aligns closely with the ALA core value of access as outlined by the ALA council: “All information resources that are provided directly or indirectly by the library, regardless of technology, format, or methods of delivery, should be readily, equally, and equitably accessible to all library users.” It has gained considerable momentum in recent years among librarians in institutions of higher education, spurring funds dedicated to support authors who wish to publish in open access journals, the creation of library-run online open access journals, and open access mandates for faculty members.”

Source: Community Code: Supporting the Mission of Open Access and Preservation with the Use of Open Source Library Technologies | Florida State University Libraries

 

 

For the First Time in More Than 20 Years, Copyrighted Works Will Enter the Public Domain | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian

From Glenn Fleishman via Smithsonian Magazine:

At midnight on New Year’s Eve, all works first published in the United States in 1923 will enter the public domain. It has been 21 years since the last mass expiration of copyright in the U.S.

“That deluge of works includes not just “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” which appeared first in the New Republic in 1923, but hundreds of thousands of books, musical compositions, paintings, poems, photographs and films. After January 1, any record label can issue a dubstep version of the 1923 hit “Yes! We Have No Bananas,” any middle school can produce Theodore Pratt’s stage adaptation of The Picture of Dorian Gray, and any historian can publish Winston Churchill’s The World Crisis with her own extensive annotations. Any artist can create and sell a feminist response to Marcel Duchamp’s seminal Dadaist piece, The Large Glass (The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even) and any filmmaker can remake Cecil B. DeMille’s original The Ten Commandments and post it on YouTube.”

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Source: For the First Time in More Than 20 Years, Copyrighted Works Will Enter the Public Domain | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian

The First Step Towards a System of Open Digital Scholarly Communication Infrastructure – IO: In The Open

From David W. Lewis, Mike Roy, and Katherine Skinner via In the Open

“We are working on a project to map the infrastructure required to support digital scholarly communications.  This project is an outgrowth of David W. Lewis’ “2.5% Commitment” proposal.

Even in the early stages of this effort we have had to confront several uncomfortable truths.”

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Source: The First Step Towards a System of Open Digital Scholarly Communication Infrastructure – IO: In The Open

Draft ACRL Scholarly Communications Research Agenda Feedback Due Jan 4 – ACRL Insider

From Kara Malenfant via ACRL Insider:

“Rebecca Kennison and Nancy Maron, selected by ACRL to design, develop, and deliver a new research agenda for scholarly communications and the research environment, have been hard at work since March 2018 with guidance and input from ACRL’s Research and Scholarly Environment Committee (ReSEC). ACRL is now seeking public comment on a draft document by COB Friday, January 4, 2019.

Developed with a high degree of community involvement—particularly historically underrepresented groups—this powerful new ACRL action-oriented agenda is intended to encourage the community to make the scholarly communications system more open, inclusive, and equitable by addressing issues concerning people, content, and systems. It outlines trends, encourages practical actions, and clearly identifies the most strategic research questions to pursue.”

Source: Draft ACRL Scholarly Communications Research Agenda Feedback Due Jan 4 – ACRL Insider