Category: All Posts

Differentiating Between Open Access and Open Educational Resources | VTechWorks

From Anita Walz:

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Differentiating open access and open educational resource can be a challenge in some contexts. Excellent resources such as “How Open Is It?: A Guide for Evaluating the Openness of Journals” (CC BY) https://sparcopen.org/our-work/howopenisit created by SPARC, PLOS, and OASPA greatly aid us in understanding the relative openness of journals. However, visual resources to conceptually differentiate open educational resources (OER) from resources disseminated using an open access approach do not currently exist. Until now.
This one page introductory guide differentiates OER and OA materials on the basis of purpose (teaching vs. research), method of access (analog and digital), and in terms of the relative freedoms offered by different levels of Creative Commons licenses, the most common open license. Many other open licenses, including open software licenses also exist.

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Source: Differentiating Between Open Access and Open Educational Resources

SPARC Releases Connect OER Annual Report for 2018-2019 – SPARC

From SPARC:

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SPARC is pleased to release our 2018-2019 Connect OER Annual Report, which offers insights about OER activities across North America. This year’s report examines the current state of OER activities featuring data from 132 institutions in the U.S. and Canada. Our intent is that these insights will help inform SPARC members, open education advocates, and the library community about current trends, best practices, and the collective impact being achieved through OER at participating institutions. Click here to download the report.

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Source: SPARC Releases Connect OER Annual Report for 2018-2019 – SPARC

OA in the Open: Community Needs and Perspectives | LIS Scholarship Archive Works |

From Rebecca Kennison, Judy Ruttenberg, Yasmeen Shorish, and Liz Thompson in LIS Scholarship Archive Works:

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The National Forum described here was proposed as a first step in surfacing community requirements and principles toward a collective open access (OA) collection development system. The Forum asked participants to envision a collective funding environment for libraries to contribute provisioning or sustaining funds to OA content providers. A critical component of this project was to bring together groups of interested and invested individuals with different priorities and perspectives and begin to build a community of engagement and dialogue. By analyzing focus group feedback and leveraging the insights and interactions of participants, this paper presents the challenges, opportunities, and potential next steps for building an OA collection development model and culture based on a community of collective action.

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Source: LIS Scholarship Archive Works | OA in the Open: Community Needs and Perspectives

Libraries and Archivists Are Scanning and Uploading Books That Are Secretly in the Public Domain – VICE

From Karl Bode in Motherboard Tech by VICE:

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A coalition of archivists, activists, and libraries are working overtime to make it easier to identify the many books that are secretly in the public domain, digitize them, and make them freely available online to everyone. The people behind the effort are now hoping to upload these books to the Internet Archive, one of the largest digital archives on the internet.

As it currently stands, all books published in the U.S. before 1924 are in the public domain, meaning they’re publicly owned and can be freely used and copied. Books published in 1964 and after are still in copyright, and by law will be for 95 years from their publication date.

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Source: Libraries and Archivists Are Scanning and Uploading Books That Are Secretly in the Public Domain – VICE

A 21st Century Solution to the Serials Crisis: White paper | Scholastica

From Scholastica:

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As the cost of academic journals continues to rise, institutions and individual scholars are increasingly at risk of losing access to leading research. Time is running out to break this dangerous cycle. This white paper brings together key literature and insights from 5 expert open access (OA) advocates to survey the journal publishing landscape and explore ways research can affordably be made OA. The paper argues the keys to an OA future are: decentralization of the journal market, online-only publishing, and democratization of article production via services.

The paper overviews:

  • The past and present state of journal publishing
  • Current alternatives to the corporate publisher model
  • Steps to realize sustainable, open access-friendly journal models

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Source: A 21st Century Solution to the Serials Crisis: White paper

A Guest Post from CCC – Top 5 Resources on Transformative Agreements – OASPA

From Chuck Hemenway in Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association Blog:

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Transformative Agreements are a popular topic of conversation these days – but do you ever feel like you need a quick refresher course on the topic? Read, watch, or listen to the items below for a deeper practical understanding of Transformative Agreements, fast.

1. “TRANSFORMATIVE AGREEMENTS: What are transformative agreements?” from ESAC Initiative

Transformative Agreements are those contracts negotiated between institutions (libraries, national and regional consortia) and publishers that transform the business model underlying scholarly journal publishing, moving from one based on toll access (subscription) to one in which publishers are remunerated a fair price for their open access publishing services.
Bonus: Browse ESAC’s Agreement Registry for summaries of dozens of recent Transformative Agreements.

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Source: A Guest Post from CCC – Top 5 Resources on Transformative Agreements – OASPA

Pursuing a new kind of “big deal” with publishers | Inside Higher Ed

From Lindsay McKenzie in Inside Higher Ed:

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Making the transition from paying to read to paying to publish academic research won’t be easy for universities or publishers. But it is possible, attendees at an open-access-publishing event were told Thursday.

The University of California, which canceled its “big deal” with publisher Elsevier earlier this year after negotiations to establish a new agreement broke down, hosted a public forum discussing how libraries, publishers and funders can support a system where all research articles are made free to read at the time of publication — a standard known as gold open access.

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Source: Pursuing a new kind of “big deal” with publishers

Teaching and Learning Without a Textbook: Undergraduate Student Perceptions of Open Educational Resources| International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning

From Hong Lin in International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning:

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Given the upsurge of textbook costs, college students increasingly expect universities and instructors to offer alternatives to traditional textbooks. One textbook alternative is using open educational resources (OER). While OER unquestionably save students money, the question remains whether the adoption of OER (instructional materials) is aligned with open pedagogy (methods). This study investigated 46 undergraduate students’ perceptions of using only OER in an introductory course in a large American public university. As reported by study participants, advantages of using OER include textbook cost savings, access to dynamic and plentiful OER materials, that OER enabling mobile learning, and that OER foster the development of self-directed skills and copyright guidelines. Challenges reported include lacking a tactile sense with OER, slow Internet connections, unclear instruction and guidance, and insufficient self-regulation skills. Course design and implementation
considerations were discussed.

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Source: Teaching and Learning Without a Textbook: Undergraduate Student Perceptions of Open Educational Resources| International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning

Can we transform scholarly communication with open source and community‐owned infrastructure?|Learned Publishing

From Alison McGonagle‐O’Connell and Kristen Ratanin in Learned Publishing:

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When it comes to infrastructure, scholarly publishing has been slow to evolve, and recent consolidation has weakened the competitive landscape. Publishers are waking up to learn that their most valuable asset – their publishing pipeline and accompanying workflow data – is suddenly owned by a potentially competitive organization whose values may not align with their own. Options to break away are challenging due to contracts, vendor lock in, and migration costs.

When consolidation occurred in content, as larger publishers acquired smaller publishers, costs went up. The increasing consolidation in technology and services will likely drive the costs of the current platform vendors up as well and offer fewer choices. Small‐ and mid‐sized publishers are faced with a decision to try and operate independently or partner with commercial publishers or vendors. These partnerships increasingly challenge their core values, such as independence and autonomy, research‐driven mission and goals, and control over business models and workflow.

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Source: Can we transform scholarly communication with open source and community‐owned infrastructure? – McGonagle‐O’Connell – 2019 – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

Open educational resources, student efficacy, and user perceptions: a synthesis of research published between 2015 and 2018 | Educational Technology Research and Development

From John Hilton in Educational Technology Research and Development:

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Although textbooks are a traditional component in many higher education contexts, their increasing price have led many students to forgo purchasing them and some faculty to seek substitutes. One such alternative is open educational resources (OER). This present study synthesizes results from sixteen efficacy and twenty perceptions studies involving 121,168 students or faculty that examine either (1) OER and student efficacy in higher education settings or (2) the perceptions of college students and/or instructors who have used OER. Results across these studies suggest students achieve the same or better learning outcomes when using OER while saving significant amounts of money. The results also indicate that the majority of faculty and students who have used OER had a positive experience and would do so again.

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Source: Open educational resources, student efficacy, and user perceptions: a synthesis of research published between 2015 and 2018 | SpringerLink