Category: All Posts

SoA demands Internet Archive stops lending books ‘unlawfully’ | The Bookseller

 

From Katie Mansfield via The Bookseller:

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“The Society of Authors has demanded the Internet Archive’s Open Library stops lending books “unlawfully” online in the UK, arguing the US practice of Controlled Digital Lending is a breach of copyright.

In an open letter, the trade body urged the San Francisco-based Internet Archive to immediately discontinue the practice of lending scanned copies of physical books on its site. “There is no legal basis for the practice of scanning books without permission or lending them in the UK,” said the SOA. “Despite this, users in the UK are currently able to borrow scanned copies of physical books from Open Library. That is a direct and actionable infringement of copyright.””

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Source: SoA demands Internet Archive stops lending books ‘unlawfully’ | The Bookseller

As OER Grows Up, Advocates Stress More Than Just Low Cost | EdSurge News

From Jeffrey R. Young and Sydney Johnson via EdSurge News:

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“Open educational resources hit a turning point in 2018. For the first time ever, the federal government put forward funds to support initiatives around open educational resources, and recent studies show that faculty attitudes towards using and adapting these openly-licensed learning materials are steadily improving.”

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Source: As OER Grows Up, Advocates Stress More Than Just Low Cost | EdSurge News

Open Access 2018: A Year of Funders and Universities Drawing Lines in the Sand | Absolutely Maybe

From Hilda Bastian via Absolutely Maybe:

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“This is the sixth year I’ve rounded up the year in open access – and it was the most remarkable. When the year began, the world’s largest academic publisher, Elsevier, had increased their annual profits, with an operating profit approaching US$1.2 billion in science, technology, and medicine – a profit margin of over 36%. [PDF] By year’s end, a hefty chunk of the world’s research community was walking away from big subscription deals with Elsevier and others.”

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Source: Open Access 2018: A Year of Funders and Universities Drawing Lines in the Sand | Absolutely Maybe

DPLA receives $1.5 million grant from Alfred P. Sloan Foundation | DPLA

From DPLA:

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“The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) is pleased to announce that the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation has awarded DPLA a $1.5 million grant. The grant will enable DPLA to expand its efforts to provide an improved ebook experience for patrons through their libraries, building on its cultural heritage aggregation program.”
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Source: DPLA receives $1.5 million grant from Alfred P. Sloan Foundation | DPLA

Editorial Mutiny at Elsevier Journal | Inside Higher Ed

From Lindsay McKenzie via Inside Higher Ed:

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“The entire editorial board of the Elsevier-owned Journal of Informetrics resigned Thursday in protest over high open-access fees, restricted access to citation data and commercial control of scholarly work.

Today, the same team is launching a new fully open-access journal called Quantitative Science Studies. The journal will be for and by the academic community and will be owned by the International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics (ISSI). It will be published jointly with MIT Press.”

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Source: Elsevier journal editors resign, start rival open-access journal

The Quest to Topple Science-Stymying Academic Paywalls | WIRED

From Joi Ito via Wired:

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“SCIENCE IS BUILT, enhanced, and developed through the open and structured sharing of knowledge. Yet some publishers charge so much for subscriptions to their academic journals that even the libraries of the world’s wealthiest universities such as Harvard are no longer able to afford the prices. Those publishers’ profit margins rival those of the most profitable companies in the world, even though research is largely underwritten by governments, and the publishers don’t pay authors and researchers or the peer reviewers who evaluate those works. How is such an absurd structure able to sustain itself—and how might we change it?”

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Source: The Quest to Topple Science-Stymying Academic Paywalls | WIRED

Large Scale Publisher Survey reveals Global Trends in Open Access Publishing – News Service

From the DOAJ News Service:

“A survey of publishers with journals indexed in DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals) has revealed surprising trends in the way that content is published; what types of organisations are publishing the content; on how publishing standards are being accepted globally; and geographical trends on the uptake of open access.

The survey was sent out by DOAJ to its 6000+ account holders, that is to say publishers, in the Summer of 2018. Account holders were allowed one response each, regardless of how many journals they have in that account and all accounts have at least 1 journal active in DOAJ. The total number of responses returned was 1065. Answers revealed some interesting facts, especially when compared to answers provided in the last publisher survey carried out in 2013.”

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Source: Large Scale Publisher Survey reveals Global Trends in Open Access Publishing – News Service

Professors Worry About the Cost of Textbooks, but Free Alternatives Pose Their Own Problems – The Chronicle of Higher Education

From Beth McMurtrie via The Chronicle of Higher Education:

“When it comes to textbooks, faculty members have a lot of feelings. Many of them negative. But their thoughts on digital coursework and openly licensed materials aren’t any less conflicted.

These opinions, found in “Freeing the Textbook: Educational Resources in U.S. Higher Education, 2018,” a survey of more than 4,000 faculty members and department chairs released Wednesday, paint a complex picture of a fast-changing landscape, one in which instructors and students have more options about course materials than ever before, yet the best path forward remains unclear.”

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Source: Professors Worry About the Cost of Textbooks, but Free Alternatives Pose Their Own Problems – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Volume 6, General Issue: All content available | Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication

From Mark Newton and Melanie Schlosser, Editors-in-Chief, Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication:

“The Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication (JLSCVolume 6 General Issue is now complete. JLSC invites new submissions to the journal – please see the author guidelines for details.”

Table of Contents

Editorial

Commentary

Research Articles

Practice Articles

Brief Reviews of Books and Products

Source: Volume 6, General Issue: All content available | Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication

Community Code: Supporting the Mission of Open Access and Preservation with the Use of Open Source Library Technologies | Florida State University Libraries

From Keila Zayas-Ruiz and Mark Baggett via Florida State University Libraries:

“As librarians, we serve as champions for equal access and preservation of materials, both scholarly and cultural in significance. One of the core missions of libraries is access. Due to increased demand for scholarly articles and the technological advances of the internet, open access is quickly becoming a major priority among research libraries today. It “has expanded the possibilities for disseminating one’s own research and accessing that of others.” The movement of open access aligns closely with the ALA core value of access as outlined by the ALA council: “All information resources that are provided directly or indirectly by the library, regardless of technology, format, or methods of delivery, should be readily, equally, and equitably accessible to all library users.” It has gained considerable momentum in recent years among librarians in institutions of higher education, spurring funds dedicated to support authors who wish to publish in open access journals, the creation of library-run online open access journals, and open access mandates for faculty members.”

Source: Community Code: Supporting the Mission of Open Access and Preservation with the Use of Open Source Library Technologies | Florida State University Libraries