Category: All Posts

LSU ends Elsevier bundled journal subscription | Inside Higher Ed

From Lindsay McKenzie in Inside Higher Ed:

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LSU is just the latest of several U.S. institutions, including the University of California system, Temple University and Florida State University, to announce its intentions to end its business relationship with Elsevier in the last two years.

“For decades, LSU has subscribed to a package of some 1,800 electronic journal titles from Elsevier,” Stacia Haynie, LSU’s provost, said in a statement Monday. But “dramatic increases” in subscription costs have made the deal unsustainable, she said./blockquote>
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Source: LSU ends Elsevier bundled journal subscription

Join us for a Twitter chat! | Creative Commons USA

From Creative Commons USA:

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Next month [Wednesday, June 5, 2019 2-3pm], Creative Commons USA is hosting a Twitter chat in partnership with the Open Textbook Network, Rebus Community, Collaborative Knowledge Foundation, and Library Publishing Coalition around open licensing, CC, copyright, and other intellectual property issues.

We’re inviting practitioners from across the spectrum to join our experts – including Michael Carroll, a founding member of Creative Commons, currently a Professor of Law and the Director of the Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property, and Meredith Jacob, Public Lead for Creative Commons USA. Ethan Senack, Outreach and Policy Manager for Creative Commons USA (@esenack) will be moderating.

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Source: Join us for a Twitter chat! | Creative Commons USA

Open-Access Monographs: New Tools, More Access | EDUCAUSE

From Monica McCormick in Educause Review:

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We are in an era of significant change in the United States and Canada for publishing open-access (OA) scholarly monographs. Since most monographs are published by university presses, and most copies are purchased by research libraries, this article focuses on that community. The bulk of OA titles are older or out-of-print works, many funded by the Mellon/NEH Humanities Open Book (HOB) program, which enabled free access to backlist scholarly works. Under that program, about 2,500 books from 28 publishers are now OA. Meanwhile, new OA-only book publishers are, together with traditional scholarly presses and libraries, exploring innovative business models and technologies.

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Source: Open-Access Monographs: New Tools, More Access | EDUCAUSE

Guest Post: Evaluating Open Access in a Consortial Context – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Gwen Evans in The Scholarly Kitchen:

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As several recent announcements and initiatives have shown, Open Access (OA) negotiations between libraries and publishers are complex, in a constant state of flux, and provide little predictability — and OA models and negotiations within library consortia contain complexities all their own. One of the key questions library consortia have to ask themselves is, Are you a Publish or a Read library consortium, or somewhere in between? As Lisa Hinchliffe’s recent primer on transformative agreements notes, the implications of Publish and Read versus Read and Publish are different for different consortia.

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Source: Guest Post: Evaluating Open Access in a Consortial Context – The Scholarly Kitchen

Understanding the Impact of OER: Achievements and Challenges – UNESCO IITE

From UNESCO Institute for Information Technologies in Education:

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The publication “Understanding the Impact of OER: Achievements and Challenges” is the result of partnership between the UNESCO Institute for Information Technologies in Education (UNESCO IITE) and OER Africa, an initiative established by Saide.

It critically reviews the growth of open educational resources (OER) and its potential impact on education systems around the world; and points at some significant achievements as well as key challenges hindering the growth and potential of OER that need to be addressed.

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Source: Understanding the Impact of OER: Achievements and Challenges – UNESCO IITE

Investing in Open Scholarly Infrastructure: a Community Opportunity – SPARC

From SPARC:

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As an organization committed to making “open” the default in research and education, we at SPARC recognize that scholarship is at its best when communities of researchers and scholars are fully empowered to share, discover, and collaborate. Currently, however, the reality is that the needs of the community are not being well-served by the existing scholarly communication infrastructure, which is dominated by vendors whose missions and values often run counter to those of the community. When the business models of these vendors favor lock-in, consolidation, and monopoly, the result is a market where opportunity for healthy competition is limited, and opportunities for sharing are limited.

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Source: Investing in Open Scholarly Infrastructure: a Community Opportunity – SPARC

Cengage and McGraw-Hill merge | Inside Higher Ed

From Lindsay McKenzie in Inside Higher Ed:

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“Publishers Cengage and McGraw-Hill Education yesterday announced plans to merge and operate under the name McGraw-Hill.

As two big players in an industry with few players at the top, the merger is significant. In addition to changing the dynamic between the biggest publishers, the merger could also represent a significant upheaval for college instructors and students who rely on Cengage and McGraw-Hill Education content.”

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Source: Cengage and McGraw-Hill merge

Empowering Librarians to Support Digital Scholarship Research | ACRL 2019

From Eleanor Dickson Koehl, Harriett Green, Amanda Henley, and Terese Heidenwolf in The Proceedings of the ACRL 2019 Conference:

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“Librarians increasingly support and engage in digital scholarly research on academic campuses. But this repositioning of librarians’ work raises several challenges. First, “digital scholarship” encompasses a wide-ranging and evolving set of research behaviors, methods, and outputs across academic disciplines. Training librarians to become active facilitators of or partners in digital scholarship requires acknowledging the multifaceted ways in which digital research methodologies are applied. Next, amidst this shifting landscape, the profession has tended to separate digital scholarship or digital humanities librarianship into a professional sub-specialization. As a result, knowledge of key skills, tools, and strategies for digital scholarship are not widespread within academic libraries despite the growing demand for librarians to be trained in these areas.”

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Source: Empowering Librarians to Support Digital Scholarship Research: ACRL 2019

Whose Research is it Anyway? Academic Social Networks Versus Institutional Repositories | JLSC

From Nicole C. Eva and Tara A. Wiebe in the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication:

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“Looking for ways to increase deposits into their institutional repository (IR), researchers at one institution started to mine academic social networks (ASNs) (namely, ResearchGate and Academia.edu) to discover which researchers might already be predisposed to providing open access to their work. METHODS Researchers compared the numbers of institutionally affiliated faculty members appearing in the ASNs to those appearing in their institutional repositories. They also looked at how these numbers compared to overall faculty numbers.”

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Source: Whose Research is it Anyway? Academic Social Networks Versus Institutional Repositories

Ithaka S+R US Faculty Survey 2018 | Ithaka S+R

From Ithaka S+R:

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“The Ithaka S+R US Faculty Survey has tracked the changing research, teaching, and publishing practices of higher education faculty members on a triennial basis since 2000. Our aim in this project is to provide actionable findings and analysis to help colleges and universities as well as relevant support services, such as academic libraries, learned societies, and scholarly publishers, plan for the future.”

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Source: Ithaka S+R US Faculty Survey 2018 | Ithaka S+R