Category: All Posts

States mandate OER and affordable textbook labeling, but challenges remain | Inside Higher Ed

From Mark Lieberman via Inside Higher Ed:

Four states — California, Oregon, Texas and Washington — have in recent years passed legislation requiring institutions to add labels in course schedules and online registration systems for courses that use free textbooks or open educational resources (OER). Scattered institutions outside those four states have begun this process as well.

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Source: States mandate OER and affordable textbook labeling, but challenges remain

Federal Trade Commission and National Institutes of Health Take Action Against Predatory Publishing Practices – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Rick Anderson via the Scholarly Kitchen:

In an interesting and potentially significant move for the scholarly publishing world, the U.S. District Court for the District of Nevada has granted a preliminary injunction against a major journal publisher and conference organizer in response to a complaint by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). The injunction was granted on the basis of the Court’s analysis of evidence provided by the FTC and its finding that the FTC’s complaint, if allowed to proceed, “is likely to succeed on the merits” and that the public interest would be served by granting it.

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Source: Federal Trade Commission and National Institutes of Health Take Action Against Predatory Publishing Practices – The Scholarly Kitchen

Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication Volume 5, General Issue – new articles

Source: Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication

Dec 6: Adjunct Faculty’s Essential Role in OER Adoption and Degrees – CCCOER

A free webinar from CCCOER:

Join us for this webinar to hear how adjunct faculty can participate and be acknowledged for the essential role that they are playing in developing OER degree pathways at many colleges.

Read more and register here:

Source: Dec 6: Adjunct Faculty’s Essential Role in OER Adoption and Degrees – CCCOER

Research and Learning Agenda for Archives, Special, and Distinctive Collections in Research Libraries | OCLC

From Chela Scott Weber, Practitioner Researcher in Residence for the OCLC Research Library Partnership

This research and learning agenda represents the latest in a long line of OCLC Research efforts on behalf of archives and special collections in research libraries, to discern and respond to current and emerging needs in the community, and to convene colleagues across the profession to collectively move the profession forward. It is practitioner focused and represents the results of numerous conversations, reading broadly, and thinking carefully about the most pressing needs that face our collective collections and operations. The agenda addresses areas of inquiry and potential research and learning opportunities, building on recent work in the profession.

Several themes and topical areas of investigation are identified, and the paper presents potential research and learning activities for each of these areas. Ultimately, using this agenda, the RLP will consider where work is already being done in the profession, how OCLC can best leverage its strengths and resources to make the most impact, and where there is interest and energy across the RLP community, in order to discern where it makes most sense for OCLC to focus its efforts.

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Source: Research and Learning Agenda for Archives, Special, and Distinctive Collections in Research Libraries

Study On Copyright Limitations And Exceptions For Libraries And Archives: Updated And Revised (2017 Edition) | WIPO Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights

From Dr. Kenny Crews and the WIPO Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights:

Copyright statutes from most countries of the world include exceptions or limitations applicable
specifically to libraries and archives. These provisions play an important role in facilitating
library services and serving private and public interests in copyright law. This report offers an
examination and analysis of copyright exceptions applicable to libraries and archives from the
copyright laws of all 191 countries of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO).

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Source: http://www.wipo.int/edocs/mdocs/copyright/en/sccr_35/sccr_35_6.pdf

Books and the OA effect: One publisher’s perspective – OASPA

From Ros Pyne, Head of Policy and Development, Open Research at Springer Nature

Where there are undeniable challenges in introducing a sustainable OA books model, we also see opportunities to drive open access forward and advance discovery through experimentation. As of October 2017, Springer Nature has published more than 400 open access books on SpringerLink, from our SpringerOpen and Palgrave Macmillan imprints. This means that we have a solid and growing dataset from which to investigate the so-called ‘OA effect’.

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Source: Books and the OA effect: One publisher’s perspective – OASPA

Who posted all those articles to ResearchGate anyway? | Scholarly Communications @ Duke

From David Hansen, J.D.:

You may have heard about recent legal action against ResearchGate brought by several large academic publishers organized under name of the “Coalition for Responsible Sharing” (Elsevier, Wiley, Wolters Kluwer, Brill, and ACS). Some of its members filed a lawsuit against ResearchGate and sent ResearchGate copyright takedown notices for many articles posted there. There are some good summaries of the dispute already, including this one by Mike Wolfe at UC Davis and this one on Science Magazine Online.

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Source: Scholarly Communications @ Duke – Discussions about the changing world of scholarly communications and copyright

SPEC Kit 357 Libraries, Presses, and Publishing

From Laurie N. Taylor, Brian W. Keith et al.:

Abstract

Many Association of Research Libraries (ARL) members have robust and long-standing publishing activities, often in collaboration with or running parallel to the press of the larger institutional entity. As reported in the Association of American University Presses (AAUP) 2015–2016 annual report, 30 AAUP member presses are in libraries. Eighty-one institutions are both ARL and AAUP members, and at 21 of those institutions, the press reports to the library. Other libraries—including Amherst College Press and the University of Cincinnati Press—launched new presses within libraries. Most of the 123 ARL member libraries are engaged in publishing or publishing support activities such as hosting digital publications, administering open access publishing systems, creating open educational resources, providing editorial services, or participating on scholarly advisory boards.

The findings from this survey complement the ongoing work of LPC, ARL, and AAUP on libraries and publishing to inform on the expansive breadth of practice taking place at the intersection of research libraries, presses, and publishing. By investigating ARL institutional landscapes and practices as they relate to presses and publishing, this study complements and extends prior SPEC Kits that focused on digital scholarship, digital humanities, open educational resources, and digital collections and services by exploring aspects of publishing activities in the specific context of press collaborations, integrations, and partnerships. The survey results are based on responses from 63 of the 123 ARL member libraries (51%) between July 5 and August 8, 2017, and document activities in libraries, presses, and publishing and their relation to digital scholarship and workforce development.

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Source: “SPEC Kit 357 Libraries, Presses, and Publishing November 2017” by Laurie N. Taylor, Brian W. Keith et al.

Leading Across Boundaries: Collaborative Leadership and the Institutional Repository in Research Universities and Liberal Arts Colleges – ProQuest

From David M. Seaman, Simmons College:

Libraries often engage in services that require collaboration across stakeholder boundaries to be successful. Institutional repositories (IRs) are a good example of such a service. IRs are an infrastructure to preserve intellectual assets within a university or college, and to provide an open access showcase for that institution’s research, teaching, and creative excellence. They involve multiple stakeholders (librarians, IT experts, administrators, faculty, and students) and are typically operated by academic libraries. They have existed since the early 2000s….

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Source: Leading Across Boundaries: Collaborative Leadership and the Institutional Repository in Research Universities and Liberal Arts Colleges – ProQuest