Category: All Posts

Are Mirror Journals Just Hybrid Open Access Journals In Disguise Or Are They A Viable Route To The Open Access Future? | A Way of Happening

From Ryan Regier in A Way of Happening: A Research Library Blog:

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“Developments in the open access world seem to be moving at a lightning pace lately. Plan S has added a realism and urgency to OA discussions. Never to be behind on any ‘scholcomm’ development, Elsevier has started a pilot program of launching what they are calling ‘Mirror Journals’.  Open Access (OA) ‘copies’ of existing peer reviewed journals. Journals that are “fully gold open access but share the same editorial board, aims and scope and peer review policies as their existing “parent” journals – and the same level of visibility and discoverability.”

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Source: Are Mirror Journals Just Hybrid Open Access Journals In Disguise Or Are They A Viable Route To The Open Access Future? | A Way of Happening

Researcher to Reader (R2R) Debate: Is Sci-Hub Good or Bad for Scholarly Communication? – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Rick Anderson in The Scholarly Kitchen:

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“One plenary session of the 2019 Researcher to Reader (R2R) Conference was a debate on the proposition “Resolved: Sci-Hub is doing more good than harm to scholarly communication.” Arguing in favor of the resolution was Daniel Himmelstein, a postdoctoral fellow in genomics at the University of Pennsylvania. Arguing against it was Justin Spence, partner and co-founder of PSI Ltd., and the IP Registry.”

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Source: Researcher to Reader (R2R) Debate: Is Sci-Hub Good or Bad for Scholarly Communication? – The Scholarly Kitchen

OLA Quarterly | Pacific University

From OLA Quarterly, Volume 24, Number 3 (2019) Open Educational Resources: Opportunities, Challenges, Impact!
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Articles
Sciences and Technology Open Resources: A Collaborative Effort Between Libraries and Faculty
Adelaide Clark and Dawn Lowe-Wincentsen

iFixit With the Library: Partnering for Open Pedagogy in Technical Writing
Forrest Johnson and Michaela Willi Hooper

Extending Open Textbook Network Workshop and Reviews to Include All OER and Library Materials
Jennifer Lantrip, Amy Hofer, and Carol McGeehon

Let Us Get You Into College: Community College Librarians, Barnes & Noble, and OER
Colleen Sanders

Getting up to Speed on OER: Advice from a Newbie
Amy Stanforth

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Source: OLA Quarterly | Pacific University

Open Access Toolkit: DARIAH’s practical recommendations to promote Open Access within the arts and humanities – DARIAH Open

From Erzsébet Tóth-Czifra Laurent Romary in DARIAH Open:

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Where can I find Open Access journals in my field? When and how can I share my article as a preprint? Does publishing Open Access necessarily involve paying processing charges? These are just some of the questions we are asking from ourselves when exploring the options for open dissemination of our research. In this post, which is the second part of our Open Access in the humanities blog series, we bring together recommendations, tools, platforms and other resources that you may find helpful in answering these questions. All of them are available for everyone, regardless of geographical or disciplinary background, and can be directly and easily included in the publishing workflows of our communities.

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Source: Open Access Toolkit: DARIAH’s practical recommendations to promote Open Access within the arts and humanities – DARIAH Open

Guest Post – Low Cost Textbook Alternatives: Worth the Effort? – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Liz Gabbitas in The Scholarly Kitchen:

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College textbooks are expensive. In most industries, a more expensive product is also a higher quality one. However, in college textbook publishing this may not be true. In the following case study, an instructor at the University of Utah on the hunt for better materials for an entry-level Arabic language course came to the library looking to create a solution. This article explores the resulting workbook, the collaborative process, and the future of course materials like this one.

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Source: Guest Post – Low Cost Textbook Alternatives: Worth the Effort? – The Scholarly Kitchen

Open statement: Why UC cut ties with Elsevier | UC Berkeley Library News

From the UC-Elsevier Negotiating Team in UC Berkeley Library News:

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The University of California has taken a firm stand on both open access to publicly funded research and fiscal responsibility by deciding not to renew its subscriptions with Elsevier, the world’s largest scientific publisher. Here’s why:

Under Elsevier’s proposed terms, the publisher would capture significant new revenue on top of the university’s current multimillion-dollar subscription while significantly diminishing UC’s rights to Elsevier content. Elsevier’s latest proposal did consider some of UC’s conditions, including providing UC authors with open access publishing options across much of the publisher’s portfolio of journals. However, it had serious flaws.

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Source: Open statement: Why UC cut ties with Elsevier | UC Berkeley Library News

Researching Rumors About Open Access Dissertations | Authors Alliance

From Jill Cirasella and Polly Thistlethwaite in the Author’s Alliance Latest News:

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For years, we have encouraged researchers at our institution, the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, to consider the benefits—for others, themselves, and their fields of study—of making their scholarship available open access. In doing so, we have found allies, some already committed to open access and some newly swayed by our arguments.

But, like many librarians advocating openness, we have also met resistance—disinclination to make time to upload works to repositories, confusion about variations among publishers’ policies regarding authors’ rights, certainty that niche work has no broader audience, concern about the viability of scholarly societies in an open-access world, etc.

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Source: Researching Rumors About Open Access Dissertations | Authors Alliance

Volume 7, General Issue: New content available​| Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication

From JLSC:

We have opened the General Issue for Volume 7 of the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication (JLSC), and have published 7 new articles. JLSC invites new submissions to the journal – please see the author guidelines for details.

Commentary

Research Articles

Practice Articles

Brief Reviews of Books and Product

Source: Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication

SPARC Celebrates Open Education Week on Capitol Hill – SPARC

From in SPARC News:

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In celebration of international Open Education Week, SPARC teamed up on March 5th with a group of open education advocates for a day of meetings on Capitol Hill to educate lawmakers about how open textbooks can make higher education more affordable and effective for students. Our action-packed day on the Hill involved a panel briefing for Congressional staff, a meeting with long-time open textbook champion U.S. Senator Dick Durbin (D-IL), and conversations with key offices on both sides of the aisle to renew and strengthen Open Textbook Pilot funding and pass the Affordable College Textbook Act.

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Source: SPARC Celebrates Open Education Week on Capitol Hill – SPARC

Student Savings at Scale: LibreTexts – SPARC

From Caralee Adams in SPARC’s Impact Stories:

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Textbooks are so expensive that Hailey Hollinshead usually borrows from them from other students, gets used copies, and often skips buying them altogether.

So, last year when her organic chemistry professor invited students to use a free open textbook from the LibreTexts library, the 21-years-old junior at the University of Illinois Springfield was thrilled. Hollinshead didn’t have to spend $250 to $350 on a new textbook and she had access to the materials from day one.

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Source: Student Savings at Scale: LibreTexts – SPARC