Category: All Posts

University of California cancels deal with Elsevier after months of negotiations | Inside Higher Ed

From Lindsay McKenzie in Inside Higher Ed:

Preview:

The University of California System has canceled its multimillion-dollar subscription contract with Elsevier, an academic publisher.

Other institutions have canceled their “big deal” journal subscription contracts with major publishers before. But none in the U.S. have the financial and scholarly clout of the UC system — which accounts for nearly 10 percent of the nation’s publishing output.

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Source: University of California cancels deal with Elsevier after months of negotiations

Reframing the Conversation about OER | Digital Tweed

From Kenneth C. Green in Digital Tweed/Inside Higher Ed:

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It’s time to add OER – Open Education Resources – to a list of technologies (or technology resources) that might really be a catalyst for major change in higher education. Admittedly, it is still very early days here – the front end of the Gardner Hype Cycle fueled initially by the Peak of Inflated Expectations, followed by the Trough of Disillusionment, which leads into the Slope of Enlightenment, until we arrive at the Plateau of Productivity.  (Remember the NY Times declaration that 2012 was the “Year of the MOOC?”)  We’re a long way from the plateau with OER.

The basic OER arguments, offered with great passion by OER advocates and evangelists, are compelling.  First, commercial textbooks are expensive.  Second, OER offers a seemingly pragmatic strategy to provide “Day One” access to core course materials for students in critical gateway courses.  And third, the absence of copyright and related clearance issues means that OER provides significant flexibility for faculty as they select and mix curricular materials from various sources for their syllabi.

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Source: Reframing the Conversation about OER | Digital Tweed

Building Capacity for Academy-Owned Publishing through the Library Publishing Coalition | Library Trends

From Melanie Schlosser in Library Trends:

Abstract:

Library publishing is both a growing area of interest in academic
libraries and an increasingly visible subfield of scholarly publishing.
This article introduces the field of library publishing—and the opportunities and values that make it unique—from the perspective of
the Library Publishing Coalition (LPC). The LPC is an independent,
community-led membership association of academic and research
libraries and library consortia engaged in scholarly publishing, and
it is the only professional association dedicated to this emerging area
of librarianship. In its first five years, LPC has produced a robust
set of resources to support library publishers, including the annual
Library Publishing Forum, the annual Library Publishing Directory,
and a variety of freely available professional development resources.
It has also built a strong community of members and an extended
network of affiliates. This paper presents and contextualizes these
accomplishments and shares new developments and future directions
for the Library Publishing Coalition.

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Source: Academy-Owned Publishing through the Library Publishing Coalition | Library Trends

Arizona State and Chippewa Valley get OER grants as Education Department changes course | Inside Higher Ed

From Mark Lieberman in Inside Higher Ed:

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Last year, when Congress authorized a second round of $5 million in federal funding for programs that support open educational resources, senators included explicit instructions to the Department of Education, which administers the grant program:

  1. Conduct a new competitive process for grant applications in 2019.
  2. Disperse funds among at least 20 proposals, rather than devoting $5 million to one program, as happened last fall.

But the department appears to have gone in a different direction. Earlier this year, it quietly awarded $2.5 million to each of two applicants from last year’s submission pile. This year’s winning programs are based at Chippewa Valley Technical College and Arizona State University, according to representatives of both institutions.

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Source: Arizona State and Chippewa Valley get OER grants as Education Department changes course

Taking Stock of the Feedback on Plan S Implementation Guidance – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe in The Scholarly Kitchen:

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Like many others, I found myself reading response after response after response to cOAlition S’ call for feedback on the Guidance on the Implementation of Plan S last week. The volume of response is staggering. Statements have poured in from individual and groups — publishers, scholarly societies, disciplinary repositories, scholarly communications platforms, funding agencies, publishing professionals, libraries, library associations, and researchers themselves. As the deadline drew near on Friday, I could hardly “right click/open link in new tab” fast enough as my Twitter feed scrolled by. The input from Norway alone has reached 885 pages. The Open Access Tracking Project currently has almost 400 documents tagged oa.plan_s. reddit Open Science and Scholia/wikidata have also been tracking replies. One imagines that there is feedback that has not been shared publicly as well.

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Source: Taking Stock of the Feedback on Plan S Implementation Guidance – The Scholarly Kitchen

Open Access Is Going Mainstream. Here’s Why That Could Transform Academic Life. – The Chronicle of Higher Education

From Lindsay Ellis in the Chronicle for Higher Education:

Debate over the future of scholarly publishing felt remote to Kathryn M. Jones, an associate professor of biology at Florida State University — that is, until she attended a Faculty Senate meeting last year.

There she learned that the library might renegotiate its $2-million subscription with the publishing behemoth Elsevier, which would limit her and her colleagues’ access to groundbreaking research. Horror sank in. Like other experimental scientists, Jones regularly skims articles published in subscription journals to plan future experiments. What would happen if she couldn’t access that body of important work with the click of a button?

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Source: Open Access Is Going Mainstream. Here’s Why That Could Transform Academic Life. – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Academy-owned? Academic-led? Community-led? What’s at stake in the words we use to describe new publishing paradigms | Library Publishing Coalition

From Melanie Schlosser and Catherine Mitchell in the LPC Blog:

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“Academy-owned” seems to be the descriptor du jour in scholarly communications circles.  We talk increasingly about academy-owned infrastructure, academy-owned publishing, academy-owned publications, etc. We find ourselves at meetings and conferences where we explore the challenges of supporting new forms of scholarly research, new modes of publication, new communities of readers — and there it is again — “academy-owned,” lurking in the conversation. We write grants whose very premise is that the academy will rise to claim its rightful place as the source, the maker, the distributor, the curator of its greatest asset — knowledge. There is definitely a movement afoot.

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Source: Academy-owned? Academic-led? Community-led? What’s at stake in the words we use to describe new publishing paradigms | Library Publishing Coalition

Publishers express concern about unintended consequences of Plan S | Inside Higher Ed

From Lindsay McKenzie in Inside Higher Ed:

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The goal of Plan S is simple — make all publicly funded research immediately available to the public. It’s a goal many universities, research funders and academics say they support. The problem is agreeing on how to get there, and who should pay for it.

flurry of documents published by publishers, research funders, scholarly societies and academics earlier this month in response to a call for feedback on Plan S highlight just how little agreement there is about how to implement the European open-access initiative, which could impact scholarly publishing practices worldwide.

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Source: Publishers express concern about unintended consequences of Plan S

A Recipe for a Successful Institutional Open Education Initiative – WCET Frontiers

From Rajiv Jhangiani via WCET Frontiers:

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“I believe in the power of open education to help widen equitable access to education. I believe in using open resources, not only for the financial benefits for students, but also for the impact on teaching and learning.

As an early adopter of open textbooks, I have for years witnessed first-hand the tangible impact of the cost savings on my students’ lives. As an open textbook author, editor, and OER project manager, I have heard from numerous faculty who have taken advantage of the open licensing and built upon my efforts. They have updated, augmented, and adapted the resources available to better serve their students. As an open education researcher, I have investigated the perceptions and impact of OER adoption on students, faculty, and institutions. As an open education scholar, I have published articles, chapters, as well as a book on the subject. As an open education advocate, I have had the privilege of working with over 100 institutions across five continents to help build local capacity and guide their efforts to support this important work.”

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Source: A Recipe for a Successful Institutional Open Education Initiative – WCET Frontiers

Developing skills for scholarly communication | Jisc scholarly communications

From Helen Blanchett via Jisc scholarly communications:

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“Over the last 2 years, representatives of several organisations and institutions  with an interest in skills development around scholarly communication have been trying to progress support in this area in a collaborative way (see full list of members below).

Blog posts by Danny Kingsley on the Cambridge Unlocking Research blog (July 2017, Nov 2017) describe initial discussions and early activities around identifying issues to address. These centred around concerns around a lack of training and support for these relatively new roles and a confusion for potential applicants around what these roles actually involve.”

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Source: Developing skills for scholarly communication | Jisc scholarly communications