Category: All Posts

Survey of faculty views of technology explores online teaching, OER, assessment | Inside Higher Ed

From Doug Lederman via Inside Higher Ed:

“The proportion of college instructors who are teaching online and blended courses is growing. So is their support for using technology to deliver instruction.  But their belief in the quality and effectiveness of online courses and digital technology isn’t keeping pace.  Those are among the findings — conflicting and confounding, as is often the case — of Inside Higher Ed’s 2018 Survey of Faculty Attitudes on Technology, published today in partnership with Gallup.”

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Source: Survey of faculty views of technology explores online teaching, OER, assessment

Course Materials Adoption: A Faculty Survey and Outlook for the OER Landscape | Choice 360

From Steven Bell via Choice:

“This white paper provides an overview of the development and growth of Open Educational Resources (OER) in American higher education, followed by an analysis of the approximately 1,400 responses to a survey on course materials adoption that Choice deployed to faculty and instructors across the United States. It examines faculty behavior for discovering, evaluating, and selecting instructional material, and adds new insights on barriers specific to discovery resources and faculty adoption of OER.”

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Source: Course Materials Adoption: A Faculty Survey and Outlook for the OER Landscape | Choice 360

Announcing the Authors Alliance Guide to Understanding and Negotiating Book Publication Contracts! | Authors Alliance

From the Authors Alliance:

“We are delighted to share our brand-new guide to Understanding and Negotiating Book Publication Contracts.

Now available to the public (following a special pre-release to our Kickstarter backers), this new guide is the latest addition to our growing library of resources for authors, which also includes educational handbooks on rights reversion, open access, and fair use.

Copyright law and contract language are complex, even for attorneys and experts. Authors may be tempted to sign the first version of a publication contract that they receive, especially if negotiating seems complicated, intimidating, or risky. But there is a lot at stake for authors in a book deal, and it is well worth the effort to read the contract, understand its contents, and negotiate for favorable terms.”

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Source: Announcing the Authors Alliance Guide to Understanding and Negotiating Book Publication Contracts! | Authors Alliance

Increasing Librarian Confidence and Comprehension in a Fair Use Training Session | IDEALS @ Illinois

From Sara R. Benson:

Abstract:The results of this study illustrate that one-shot training sessions are effective in aiding librarians in academic libraries to engage with fair use. This study used testing both before and after an expert-led three-hour training session on fair use for academic librarians to measure their confidence and comprehension. The results, though limited in scope, provide encouraging evidence that appropriate training, even for a limited time, can help library professionals improve their knowledge of fair use.1 The level of confidence and comprehension rose after the academic librarian participants were provided with the three-hour fair use training. The survey results collected two weeks after the training demonstrated that some librarians had an opportunity to use the skills learned in the training in their daily work. Because fair use is frequent in the everyday experience of academic librarians, additional training for librarians through their employment is recommended. Although it would be ideal to have an expert lead such training, a ready-made curriculum would also be a useful tool for academic libraries wishing to engage in educational practices with copyright.

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Source: Increasing Librarian Confidence and Comprehension in a Fair Use Training Session | IDEALS @ Illinois

University presses take control of ebook distribution | Inside Higher Ed

From Lindsay McKenzie via Inside Higher Ed

MIT Press and the University of Michigan Press have both announced plans to start selling their ebook collections directly to libraries by creating their own distribution platforms. The publishers previously did not have a mechanism for selling to institutions directly. Instead, access to ebooks was largely brokered through third-party acquisition services such as EBSCO, ProQuest, OverDrive, Project Muse and JSTOR.

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Source: University presses take control of ebook distribution

Bridging the Chasm: Faculty Support Roles for Academic Librarians in the Adoption of Open Educational Resources | Braddlee | College & Research Libraries

Fro Dr. Braddlee, Amy VanScoy via College & Research Libraries

Abstract
Despite demonstrated student benefits from Open Educational Resources (OER), especially those in community colleges, faculty adoption remains marginal. This study is framed by diffusion of innovations theory, which acknowledges adoption of an innovation must exceed a tipping point to ensure enduring success. The study focuses on community college faculty with demonstrated OER engagement, on the basis that these faculty have greater likelihood to adopt OER and help “bridge the chasm”. In surveying faculty, we tested a range of roles librarians have played in supporting OER adoption. Findings show that faculty value librarians’ roles in discovery, cataloging, and information literacy, but are less open to librarians operating outside these traditional roles, including mentoring and policy development. Faculty were supportive of librarians’ role in advocacy for OER and overall felt that librarians have a role to play in the OER movement on their campuses.

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Source: Bridging the Chasm: Faculty Support Roles for Academic Librarians in the Adoption of Open Educational Resources | Braddlee | College & Research Libraries

The Open Access Citation Advantage: Does It Exist and What Does It Mean for Libraries? | Lewis | Information Technology and Libraries

From Colby Lewis via Information Technology and Libraries:

“The last literature review of research on the existence of an open access citation advantage (OACA)
was published in 2011 by Philip M. Davis and William H. Walters. This paper reexamines the
conclusions reached by Davis and Walters by providing a critical review of OACA literature that has
been published since 2011 and explores how increases in open access publication trends could serve
as a leveraging tool for libraries against the high costs of journal subscriptions.”

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Source: The Open Access Citation Advantage: Does It Exist and What Does It Mean for Libraries? | Lewis | Information Technology and Libraries

Getting Started: Open Textbook Network Publishing Cooperative

From the OTN:

“More and more, there is interest in supporting faculty authors in creating open textbooks for higher education. This course is designed to be pragmatic support for open textbook publishing programs, often led by librarians. Instructional designers, technologists and people who work at university presses may also be involved.

You’re invited to move through this course in whatever way works best for you. That said, it is organized in what we think is a sensible chronological order. So, if you’re not sure where to start, start at the beginning!”

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Source: Getting Started: Open Textbook Network Publishing Cooperative