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Defining OER-Enabled Pedagogy | Wiley | The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning

From Wiley and Hilton via The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning:

“The term “open pedagogy” has been used in a variety of different ways over the past several decades. In recent years, its use has also become associated with Open Educational Resources (OER). The wide range of competing definitions of open pedagogy, together with its semantic overlap with another underspecified term, open educational practices, makes it difficult to conduct research on the topic of open pedagogy. In making this claim we do not mean to cast doubt on the potential effectiveness of the many pedagogical approaches labeled open. In this article, rather than attempting to argue for a canonical definition of open pedagogy, we propose a new term, “OER-enabled pedagogy,” defined as the set of teaching and learning practices that are only possible or practical in the context of the 5R permissions that are characteristic of OER. We propose criteria used to evaluate whether a form of teaching constitutes OER-enabled pedagogy and analyze several examples of OER-enabled pedagogy with these criteria.”

Source: Defining OER-Enabled Pedagogy | Wiley | The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning

Department of Education awards pilot OER grant to UC Davis open textbook project | Inside Higher Ed

From Mark Lieberman via Inside Digital Learning:

“The federal government will award the entire $4.9 million of the first round of its OER funding pilot to a STEM-focused open textbook project out of the University of California, Davis, the Department of Education confirmed this week to “Inside Digital Learning.”

The terms of the grant required applicants to submit on behalf of a consortium. Aside from UC Davis, the winning project includes 11 institutions: three four-year institutions in the Midwest, one community college in Maryland and seven community colleges in California.”

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Source: Department of Education awards pilot OER grant to UC Davis open textbook project

U.S. Congress Renews $5 Million Open Textbook Pilot For Second Year – SPARC

From Nicole Allen via SPARC:

“Today, the U.S. Congress reaffirmed the national role of “open” in the path to college affordability by renewing the $5 million federal Open Textbook Pilot for another year. Contained in the broader Department of Defense and Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations Act of 2019, the program answers a call from students across the country to tackle textbook costs as a barrier to higher education.”

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Source: U.S. Congress Renews $5 Million Open Textbook Pilot For Second Year – SPARC

‘Sokal Squared’: Is Huge Publishing Hoax ‘Hilarious and Delightful’ or an Ugly Example of Dishonesty and Bad Faith? – The Chronicle of Higher Education

From Alexander C. Kafka via the Chronicle of Higher Education:

“James A. Lindsay, Helen Pluckrose, and Peter Boghossian, the academics who carried out a publishing hoax that targeted scholarly journals.

Reactions to an elaborate academic-journal hoax, dubbed “Sokal Squared” by one observer, came fast and furious on Wednesday. Some scholars applauded the hoax for unmasking what they called academe’s leftist, victim-obsessed ideological slant and low publishing standards. Others said it had proved nothing beyond the bad faith and dishonesty of its authors.”

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Source: ‘Sokal Squared’: Is Huge Publishing Hoax ‘Hilarious and Delightful’ or an Ugly Example of Dishonesty and Bad Faith? – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Securing community-controlled infrastructure: SPARC’s plan of action | Joseph | College & Research Libraries News

From Heather Joseph via College & Research Libraries News (with thanks to The Idealis)

“Late last year, the news of Elsevier’s acquisition of bepress, the provider of the popular Digital Commons repository platform, sent a shockwave throughout the library community. Hundreds of institutions that use Digital Commons to support their open access repositories quite literally woke up to the news that their repository services are now owned and managed by a company that is well known for its obstruction of open access in the repository space.”

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Source: Securing community-controlled infrastructure: SPARC’s plan of action | Joseph | College & Research Libraries News

View of An Analysis of Academic Libraries’ Participation in 21st Century Library Trends | Evidence Based Library and Information Practice

From Catalano et al:

Abstract:

Objective – As academic libraries evolve to meet the changing needs of students in the digital age, the emphasis has shifted from the physical book collection to a suite of services incorporating innovations in teaching, technology, and social media, among others. Based on trends identified by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) and other sources, the authors investigated the extent to which academic libraries have adopted 21st century library trends.

Methods – The authors examined the websites of 100 Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries, their branches, and 160 randomly selected academic libraries to determine whether they adopted selected 21st century library trends.

Results – Results indicated that ARL member libraries were significantly more likely to adopt these trends, quite possibly due to their larger size and larger budgets.

Conclusion – This research can assist librarians, library directors, and other stakeholders in making the case for the adoption or avoidance of particular 21st century library trends, especially where considerable outlay of funds is necessary.

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Source: View of An Analysis of Academic Libraries’ Participation in 21st Century Library Trends | Evidence Based Library and Information Practice

Towards Open Access Self Archiving Policies: A Case Study of COAR | LIBER Quarterly

From Roy et al:

Abstract:
This paper examines Open Access (OA) self archiving policies of different Open Access Repositories (OARs) affiliated to COAR (Confederation of Open Access Repositories) as partner institutes. The process of scrutiny includes three major activities – selection of databases to consult; comparison and evaluation of Open Access policies of repositories listed in the selected databases and attached to COAR group; and critical examination of available self archiving policies of these OA repositories against a set of selected criteria. The above steps lead to reporting the following results: key findings have been identified and highlighted; common practices have been analyzed in relation to the focus of this paper; and a best practice benchmark has been suggested for popularizing and strengthening OARs as national research systems. This paper may help administrators, funding agencies, policy makers and professional librarians in devising institute-specific self archiving policies for their own organizations.

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Source: Towards Open Access Self Archiving Policies: A Case Study of COAR | LIBER Quarterly

The state and evolution of Gold Open Access: A country level analysis | STI 2018 Conference proceedings

From Wang et al via the STI 2018 Conference proceedings:

Abstract:

The newly released refine option of Open Access on the Web of Science platform makes it possible to analyze the article-level OA content across the whole Web of Science database, including more than sixty million documents. In this study, employing the OA filter option of Web of Science, we perform a large-scale evaluation of the OA state of countries from 1990 to 2016. Particularly, for each country, we consider not only the absolute number of Gold OA literature but also the ratio of them among all literature. We compare the rates and evolutions of OA across countries. Our results show that the number of OA articles have increased quickly in the last decades. Currently, one quarter of the Web of Science articles are Gold OA articles; In contrast, in 1990, the percentage of OA articles is less than 8%. Brazil is found to be the most active country in OA publishing. In contrast, Russia, India and China have the lowest OA ratios. In addition, the temporal trend analysis shows that the OA percentage of Brazil has been decreasing dramatically in recent years, while the OA percentages of China, UK and Netherlands have been increasing.

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Source: The state and evolution of Gold Open Access: A country level analysis

Project MUSE: 300 “HTML5″ Open Access Books Now Available on the Redesigned MUSE Platform | LJ infoDOCKET

From Gary Price via Library Journal Info Docket”

Nearly 300 open access (OA) books are now available from Project MUSE, the highly-acclaimed online collection of humanities and social science scholarship, on a newly designed platform that represents a major step forward in OA publishing in these fields.

The books will be delivered in a highly-discoverable and adaptable format using user-friendly HTML5, rather than static PDFs, and will include titles from Johns Hopkins University Press, Cornell University Press, Duke University Press, University of Hawai’i Press, University of Michigan Press, Syracuse University Press, The MIT Press, and Temple University Press.

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Source: Project MUSE: 300 “HTML5″ Open Access Books Now Available on the Redesigned MUSE Platform | LJ infoDOCKET

Links to Presentations and Posters From the 10th Conference on Open Access Scholarly Publishing (COASP) | LJ infoDOCKET

From Gary Price via Library Journal Info Docket:

“The 10th Conference on Open Access Scholarly Publishing (#COASP10) concludes today in Vienna, Austria. We’ve been posting links to presentations and posters as we have learned about them. We plan to continue to update this post. Please bookmark and stop by again.”

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Source: Links to Presentations and Posters From the 10th Conference on Open Access Scholarly Publishing (COASP) | LJ infoDOCKET