Category: All Posts

Response to Plan S from Academic Researchers: Unethical, Too Risky! | For Better Science

From Leonind Schneider via For Better Science:

“By announcing a radical and controversial Plan S, the European Union has created facts on the ground with Open Access (OA), which is to become Gold standard (pun intended) by the year 2020. I am honoured to present you, exclusively on my site, an Appeal by several European scientists protesting against Plan S, which they fear will deprive them of quality journal venues and of international collaborative opportunities, while disadvantaging scientists whose research budgets preclude paying and playing in this OA league. The appeal authors around the Sweden-based scientist Lynn Kamerlin offer instead their own suggestions how to implement Open Science.” 

Read more here:

Source: Response to Plan S from Academic Researchers: Unethical, Too Risky! – For Better Science

Doing Digital Scholarship | SSRC Labs

From Sheila A Brennan, Megan Brett, Sharon M. Leon, SSRC Labs (with thanks to The Idealis):

“Doing Digital Scholarship offers a self-guided introduction to digital scholarship, designed for digital novices. It allows you to dip a toe into a very large field of practice. It starts with the basics, such as securing web server space, preserving data, and improving your search techniques. It then moves forward to explore different methods used for analyzing data, designing digitally inflected teaching assignments, and creating the building blocks required for publishing digital work.”

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Source: Doing Digital Scholarship

Peer reviewers unmasked: largest global survey reveals trends | Nature

From Inga Vesper via Nature:

“Scientists in developed countries provide nearly three times as many peer reviews per paper submitted as researchers in emerging nations, according to the largest ever survey of the practice.

The report — which surveyed more than 11,000 researchers worldwide — also finds a growing “reviewer fatigue”, with editors having to invite more reviewers to get each review done. The number rose from 1.9 invitations in 2013 to 2.4 in 2017.

The Global State of Peer Review report was undertaken by Publons, a website that helps academics to track their reviews and other contributions to scientific journals. The authors used data from the survey, conducted from May to July 2018, as well as data from Publons, Web of Science Core Collection and Scholar One Manuscripts databases.”

Source: Peer reviewers unmasked: largest global survey reveals trends

Google unveils search engine for open data | Nature

From Davide Castelvecchi via Nature:

“Google has unveiled a search engine to help researchers locate online data that are freely available for use. The company launched the service on 5 September, saying that it is aimed at “scientists, data journalists, data geeks, or anyone else”.”

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Source: Google unveils search engine for open data

MIT Open Access Task Force releases white paper | MIT News

From MIT News:

“The ad hoc task force on open access to MIT’s research has released “Open Access at MIT and Beyond: A White Paper of the MIT Ad Hoc Task Force on Open Access to MIT’s Research,” which examines efforts to make research and scholarship openly and freely available. The white paper provides a backdrop to the ongoing work of the task force: identifying new, updated, or revised open access policies and practices that might advance the Institute’s mission to share its knowledge with the world.” 

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Source: MIT Open Access Task Force releases white paper | MIT News

Milne Library Colleagues Launch OASIS  | SUNY Geneseo

From SUNY Geneseo:

“In the growing world of open education resources (OER), SUNY Geneseo’s Milne Library recently developed and launched an innovative new search tool that can access 52 different OER sources that contain more than 150,000 items. OASIS (Openly Available Sources Integrated Search), was co-developed by Ben Rawlins, director of Milne Library, and Bill Jones ’09, ’11, digital resources and systems librarian at SUNY Geneseo.”

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Source: Milne Library Colleagues Launch OASIS  | SUNY Geneseo

Racing to the Crossroads of Scholarly Communication and Democracy: But Who Are We Leaving Behind? – In the Library with the Lead Pipe

From April Hathcock via In the Library with the Lead Pipe (with thanks to The Idealis):

Scholarly communication has tremendous potential to help build and sustain a democratic society. Nevertheless, in our race to the crossroads of scholarly communication and democracy, it is important to examine this work through the critical lens of broader librarian professional values—with particular attention to democracy itself, access, and diversity—to ensure that we are building systems that lead to true democracy for all. Using the feminist theory of intersectionality as inspiration, this paper builds on the talk I delivered as the Vision keynote speaker for the 2017 NASIG Conference and examines the crossroads of scholarly communication and democracy through the critical lens of librarian professional values, taking a close look at the ways in which these values intersect and interact to help ensure the race to the crossroads leaves no one behind.

Source: Racing to the Crossroads of Scholarly Communication and Democracy: But Who Are We Leaving Behind? – In the Library with the Lead Pipe

Special Issue: The Role of Scholarly Communication in a Democratic Society | Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication

A special issue from the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication:

Commentary

Practice Articles

Read the issue here:

Source: Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication

Open access — the movie | Nature

From Richard Poynder via Nature:

“Billed as a documentary, Paywall would be more accurately described as an advocacy film. Its intention seems to be to persuade viewers that the paywalls that restrict access to journal content online are an unnecessary hangover from the print era, and now serve only to perpetuate the excessive profits that legacy publishers such as Elsevier, Wiley and Springer Nature make from the public purse.

The film makes a convincing case that the paywall system creates problems — and that universal open access (OA) to scholarly articles would be better for society. But it fails to adequately explore the thorny challenges that arise with OA publishing.”

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Source: Open access — the movie | Nature