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Confused about copyright? Assessing Researchers’ Comprehension of Copyright Transfer Agreements | JLSC

By Alexandra Kohn and Jessica Lange via the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication:

Abstract:

“INTRODUCTION Academic authors’ confusion about copyright and publisher policy is often cited as a challenge to their effective sharing of their own published research, from having a chilling effect on selfarchiving in institutional and subject repositories, to leading to the posting of versions of articles on social networking sites in contravention of publisher policy and beyond. This study seeks to determine the extent to which authors understand the terms of these policies as expressed in publishers’ copyright transfer agreements (CTAs), taking into account such factors as the authors’ disciplines and publishing experience, as well as the wording and structure of these agreements. METHODS We distributed an online survey experiment to corresponding authors of academic research articles indexed in the Scopus database. Participants were randomly assigned to read one of two copyright transfer agreements and were subsequently asked to answer a series of questions about these agreements to determine their level of comprehension. The survey was sent to 3,154 participants, with 122 responding, representing a 4% response rate. Basic demographic information as well as information about participants’ previous publishing experience was also collected. We analyzed the survey data using Ordinary Least Squared (OLS) regressions and probit regressions. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Participants demonstrated a low rate of understanding of the terms of the CTAs they were asked to read. Participants averaged a score of 33% on the survey, indicating a low comprehension level of author rights. This figure did not vary significantly, regardless of the respondents’ discipline, time in academia, level of experience with publishing, or whether or not they had published previously with the publisher whose CTA they were administered. Results also indicated that participants did equally poorly on the survey regardless of which of the two CTAs they received. However, academic authors do appear to have a greater chance of understanding a CTA when a specific activity is explicitly outlined in the text of the agreement.”

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Source: Confused about copyright? Assessing Researchers’ Comprehension of Copyright Transfer Agreements

The state of the field: An excerpt from the 2019 Library Publishing Directory | Library Publishing Coalition

From Melanie Schlosser via the Library Publishing Coalition:

“As much as we love the searchable online interface for the Library Publishing Directory, it doesn’t include the introduction found in the print, PDF, and EPUB versions. Each year, the Directory‘s introduction includes a ‘state of the field’ based on that year’s data that highlights trends and new developments in library publishing as reported by the programs that contribute their information. To make it easier to find, we are republishing that portion of the introduction here. This year’s introduction was written by Alexandra Hoff, Jessica Kirschner, Janet Swatscheno, and Robert Browder, with an assist from me. Enjoy!”

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Source: The state of the field: An excerpt from the 2019 Library Publishing Directory | Library Publishing Coalition

OER: A Field Guide for Academic Librarians | Pacific University Press

From Wesolek, Lashley, and Langley via Pacific University Press:

“We intend this book to act as a guide writ large for would-be champions of OER, that anyone—called to
action by the example set by our chapter authors—might serve as guides themselves. The following chapters
tap into the deep experience of practitioners who represent a meaningful cross section of higher education
institutions in North America. It is our hope that the examples and discussions presented by our authors will
facilitate connections among practitioners, foster the development of best practices for OER adoption and
creation, and more importantly, lay a foundation for novel, educational excellence.”

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Source: OER: A Field Guide for Academic Librarians | Pacific University Press 

Plan S: A Mandate for Gold OA with Lots of Strings Attached – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Angela Cochran via the Scholarly Kitchen:

“Over the past several weeks, many in the scholarly publishing world have been reacting to the open access (OA) 10 principles outlined by cOAlition S — a plan now referred to as “Plan S”. The principles laid out were interesting but lacked significant detail leading to loads of conversations trying to imagine what an implementation might look like.

Last week the “implementation plan” for Plan S compliance was posted. The biggest questions going in were whether they would really disallow hybrid models and what the proposed the APC cap would look like.”

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Source: Plan S: A Mandate for Gold OA with Lots of Strings Attached – The Scholarly Kitchen

Elsevier: the price of success | Education International

“In its most recent publication, Education International examines the publishing giant Elsevier, whose success on the market is based on ethically questionable practices which endanger the transmission of knowledge and its condition as a public good.Entitled “Democratizing Knowledge: A Report on the Academic Publisher Elsevier,” the report was drawn up for Education International (EI) by the researcher and teacher Dr Jonathan Tennant. It contains an analysis of the practices of publishing giant Elsevier, the market leader in the publication of articles and periodicals of academic research, and the consequences of its dominant position on the academic and research community.”

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Source: Elsevier: the price of success

North Dakota audit reports significant cost savings after OER initiative | Inside Higher Ed

From Mark Lieberman via Inside Higher Ed:

“North Dakota’s investment of $110,000 in open educational resources saved students at the state’s public institutions at least 10 times that amount — and likely much more — in textbook costs over two academic years, according to a new report from the state auditor’s office.”

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Source: North Dakota audit reports significant cost savings after OER initiative

Talkin’ ‘Bout OER | Texas ScholarWorks

From Bastone et al:

“This is an informational document with talking points about open educational resources for different potential audiences, like faculty, administrators, and students. The document was started as a brainstorming activity at an OER Workshop at UT Austin on July 24, 2018.”

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Source: Talkin’ ‘Bout OER

Learning Lessons from DPLA – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Roger Schonfeld via The Scholarly Kitchen:

“DPLA — the Digital Public Library of America — last week laid off six members of its small staff. Over the weekend, DPLA executive director John Bracken, in a talk at the LITA Forum, provided an overview of DPLA’s vision, which appears to include a change in strategic direction. DPLA is a not-for-profit organization with a strong board including library leaders Brian Bannon of Chicago Public, Chris Bourg of MIT, and Denise Stephens of Washington University St. Louis, Oxford University Press’s Niko Pfund, and Wikimedia CEO Katherine Maher, among others. DPLA launched five years ago, with a strategy focused on aggregating and curating special collections and a technical approach that made sense for the web that was celebrated here in the Kitchen. It now appears to be pivoting more towards ebook distribution systems. It is also clearly facing some difficulties right now. “

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Source: Learning Lessons from DPLA – The Scholarly Kitchen

The Rebus Guide to Publishing Open Textbooks (So Far) – Simple Book Publishing

From Apurva Ashok and Zoe Wake Hyde:

“The Rebus Guide to Publishing Open Textbooks (So Far) is a living repository of collective knowledge, written to equip all those who want to publish open textbooks with the resources they need. Representing two years of collaboration, innumerable conversations and exchanges, and a wide range of collective knowledge and experience, the Guide is a book-in-progress and will evolve and grow over time. Join the project discussion and help shape its development!”

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Source: The Rebus Guide to Publishing Open Textbooks (So Far) – Simple Book Publishing

An A-Z list of scholarly publishing and open science platforms – BMJ Digital

From BMJ Digital:

Inspired by Ian Mulvany’s tweet about Vega Academic Publishing System (which does look interesting, especially the partnership with Oslo School of Architecture and Design). We thought we would publish the list of publishing platforms that we keep an eye on.  The list is a bit of a jumble and includes a number of platforms like Aletheia, PubPub and Authorea aimed at authors who want to self-publish. A number of open science initiatives like Pluto Network, Lab Scribbles and the open archive HAL. Publishers like Elsevier and SpringerNature who run their own platforms but don’t open them up to other publishers aren’t listed. 

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Source: An A-Z list of scholarly publishing and open science platforms (Updated 6 November 2018) – BMJ Digital