Category: Copyright

Harder to Find than Nemo: The Elusive Image Citation Standard | Weinraub | College & Research Libraries

New image citation standards need to be developed for college and graduate students to meet visual literacy standards. The MLA Handbook, 8th edition, and Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition, do not adequately clarify how to caption, attribute, and cite images. Other image captioning and citing resources are available, but they refer to the MLA and Chicago manuals. Image captions from scholarly journals vary widely and cannot be used as examples for students to follow. Recommendations are also provided for future editions of the MLA Handbook and Chicago Manual of Style.

Read more here:
Source: Harder to Find than Nemo: The Elusive Image Citation Standard | Weinraub | College & Research Libraries

A Mass of Copyrighted Works Will Soon Enter the Public Domain | The Atlantic

From the Glenn Fleishman at The Atlantic:

The Great American Novel enters the public domain on January 1, 2019—quite literally. Not the concept, but the book by William Carlos Williams. It will be joined by hundreds of thousands of other books, musical scores, and films first published in the United States during 1923. It’s the first time since 1998 for a mass shift to the public domain of material protected under copyright. It’s also the beginning of a new annual tradition: For several decades from 2019 onward, each New Year’s Day will unleash a full year’s worth of works published 95 years earlier.

Read more here:
Source: A Mass of Copyrighted Works Will Soon Enter the Public Domain – The Atlantic

Volume 2, No 1 | Journal of Copyright in Education & Librarianship

From the Journal of Copyright in Education & Librarianship, new content available:

In this issue of JCEL you will find the proceedings from the 2017 Kraemer Copyright Conference, held June 5-6 at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs. It includes session summaries, contributed papers, and posters that were presented at the conference.

Source: Journal of Copyright in Education & Librarianship

CopyTalk Webinars | Advocacy, Legislation & Issues

A free webinar series from ALA with recordings and slides available:

“The OITP Copyright Education Subcommittee sponsors CopyTalk, a series of webinars on specific copyright topics that include orphan works, mass digitization, international copyright developments, pending and recent copyright court cases, the copyright implications of new technologies, and more.”

Read more and view the webinars here:

Source: CopyTalk Webinars | Advocacy, Legislation & Issues

Sharing and Republishing Content – Copyrightlaws.com

From Lesley Ellen Harris:

“Sharing and republishing content happens all the time on the internet. However, you need to keep copyright law in mind when sharing and republishing content you don’t own. Below are six essential facts about copyright law, plus six tips for staying on the right side of it whenever sharing and republishing articles, images and presentations and other content.”

Read more here:
Source: Sharing and Republishing Content – Copyrightlaws.com: Copyright courses and education in plain English

Copyright in 2018 | Information Today

From Corilee Christou via Information Today:

This year began with a new presidential administration, a new congressional term, and a U.S. Copyright Office without a permanent Register of Copyrights. Several copyright-related legislative proposals were brought forward but not finalized in 2017, and they remain on the legislative calendar for 2018. Here are some predictions from several well-known individuals who are active in the copyright space on what will or will not happen in 2018.

Read more here:

Source: Copyright in 2018 | Information Today

Study On Copyright Limitations And Exceptions For Libraries And Archives: Updated And Revised (2017 Edition) | WIPO Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights

From Dr. Kenny Crews and the WIPO Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights:

Copyright statutes from most countries of the world include exceptions or limitations applicable
specifically to libraries and archives. These provisions play an important role in facilitating
library services and serving private and public interests in copyright law. This report offers an
examination and analysis of copyright exceptions applicable to libraries and archives from the
copyright laws of all 191 countries of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO).

Read more here:
Source: http://www.wipo.int/edocs/mdocs/copyright/en/sccr_35/sccr_35_6.pdf

v29 #4 Community-Led Teaching and Learning: Designing an Open Educational Resource for Scholarly Communication and Legal Issues | Against The Grain

From Josh Bolick,  Maria Bonn, and Will Cross via Against the Grain:

The open educational resources (OER) movement is growing at a rapid pace — not as rapidly as prices for textbooks have risen over the course of the last decades, and not rapidly enough to yet meet the exigent needs of students, many of whom take educational risks to alleviate costs by forgoing required materials.1  As discussed in last year’s Against the Grain special issue,2 in order to support those students, libraries and librarians have become staunch advocates for open education and open textbooks.  Yet, our community often still relies upon commercial textbooks for our own professionalization.  This is especially true for legal issues like copyright and privacy, which — when they are offered at all — often borrow textbooks that reflect the overpriced nature of law school textbook prices.

Read more here:
Source: v29 #4 Community-Led Teaching and Learning: Designing an Open Educational Resource for Scholarly Communication and Legal Issues | Against The Grain

Copyright Basics for Cultural Heritage Collections – Indiana Memory DPLA Hub

From Indiana Memory DPLA Hub:

  • Who: Greg Cram, the copyright attorney from New York Public Library
  • What: Copyright workshop sponsored by IMDPLA and The Indiana Album
  • Where: Indiana State Library
  • When: Monday, November 6, 2017 from 9:00-4:30
  • Why:

Feeling confused about copyright? As more of our cultural heritage is digitized and made accessible online by collecting institutions, users are encountering a bewildering variety of information about the rights in digital objects. Recognizing the need to standardize this information, DPLA and Europeana have developed a set of twelve rights statements that are simple, descriptive, and flexible. These statements can be found at RightsStatements.org.

Read more here:
Source: Copyright Basics for Cultural Heritage Collections – Indiana Memory DPLA Hub

CC Certificates spring into action – Creative Commons

From Creative Commons:

In order to better teach open tools and practices to communities around the world, Creative Commons has developed open educational resources and a certification program called the CC Certificate.

Of course, the underlying course content will be freely available to the public and CC-licensed, including text, images, and videos. The content covers Creative Commons as a whole – the organization, the tools, and the movement. We are treating this as a chance to tell the full story of what CC is and what we do. The materials include sections on the basics of copyright law, many of the ins and outs of CC licenses, practical information about how to use the licenses and how to use CC-licensed work, information about the values connected to use of CC, and case studies about what it looks like in the real world. For a full preview of the course topics, see the current syllabus here.

Read more here:

Source: CC Certificates spring into action – Creative Commons