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Category: Library Publishing

Academy-owned? Academic-led? Community-led? What’s at stake in the words we use to describe new publishing paradigms | Library Publishing Coalition

From Melanie Schlosser and Catherine Mitchell in the LPC Blog:

Preview:

“Academy-owned” seems to be the descriptor du jour in scholarly communications circles.  We talk increasingly about academy-owned infrastructure, academy-owned publishing, academy-owned publications, etc. We find ourselves at meetings and conferences where we explore the challenges of supporting new forms of scholarly research, new modes of publication, new communities of readers — and there it is again — “academy-owned,” lurking in the conversation. We write grants whose very premise is that the academy will rise to claim its rightful place as the source, the maker, the distributor, the curator of its greatest asset — knowledge. There is definitely a movement afoot.

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Source: Academy-owned? Academic-led? Community-led? What’s at stake in the words we use to describe new publishing paradigms | Library Publishing Coalition

More Scholarly Communications Consolidation as Institutional Repository Provider DuraSpace Merges into Lyrasis – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Roger C. Schonfeld via the Scholarly Kitchen:

Preview:

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Source: More Scholarly Communications Consolidation as Institutional Repository Provider DuraSpace Merges into Lyrasis – The Scholarly Kitchen

The state of the field: An excerpt from the 2019 Library Publishing Directory | Library Publishing Coalition

From Melanie Schlosser via the Library Publishing Coalition:

“As much as we love the searchable online interface for the Library Publishing Directory, it doesn’t include the introduction found in the print, PDF, and EPUB versions. Each year, the Directory‘s introduction includes a ‘state of the field’ based on that year’s data that highlights trends and new developments in library publishing as reported by the programs that contribute their information. To make it easier to find, we are republishing that portion of the introduction here. This year’s introduction was written by Alexandra Hoff, Jessica Kirschner, Janet Swatscheno, and Robert Browder, with an assist from me. Enjoy!”

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Source: The state of the field: An excerpt from the 2019 Library Publishing Directory | Library Publishing Coalition

The Rebus Guide to Publishing Open Textbooks (So Far) – Simple Book Publishing

From Apurva Ashok and Zoe Wake Hyde:

“The Rebus Guide to Publishing Open Textbooks (So Far) is a living repository of collective knowledge, written to equip all those who want to publish open textbooks with the resources they need. Representing two years of collaboration, innumerable conversations and exchanges, and a wide range of collective knowledge and experience, the Guide is a book-in-progress and will evolve and grow over time. Join the project discussion and help shape its development!”

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Source: The Rebus Guide to Publishing Open Textbooks (So Far) – Simple Book Publishing

An A-Z list of scholarly publishing and open science platforms – BMJ Digital

From BMJ Digital:

Inspired by Ian Mulvany’s tweet about Vega Academic Publishing System (which does look interesting, especially the partnership with Oslo School of Architecture and Design). We thought we would publish the list of publishing platforms that we keep an eye on.  The list is a bit of a jumble and includes a number of platforms like Aletheia, PubPub and Authorea aimed at authors who want to self-publish. A number of open science initiatives like Pluto Network, Lab Scribbles and the open archive HAL. Publishers like Elsevier and SpringerNature who run their own platforms but don’t open them up to other publishers aren’t listed. 

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Source: An A-Z list of scholarly publishing and open science platforms (Updated 6 November 2018) – BMJ Digital

DOAJ How-To Guide | LPC DOAJ Task Force

From the Library Publishing Coalition DOAJ Task Force (2017-18):

“In partnership with the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), LPC has created a how-to guide that walks applicants through the DOAJ application process step-by-step. The guide includes explanations of commonly misunderstood questions and information specific to library publishing. Having a journal indexed in DOAJ is a marker of quality for publishers, but the application process is sometimes daunting. We hope this new resource will help more library publishers to successfully apply for inclusion in the index!”

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Source: DOAJ how-to guide, LPC DOAJ task force – Google Docs

Getting Started: Open Textbook Network Publishing Cooperative

From the OTN:

“More and more, there is interest in supporting faculty authors in creating open textbooks for higher education. This course is designed to be pragmatic support for open textbook publishing programs, often led by librarians. Instructional designers, technologists and people who work at university presses may also be involved.

You’re invited to move through this course in whatever way works best for you. That said, it is organized in what we think is a sensible chronological order. So, if you’re not sure where to start, start at the beginning!”

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Source: Getting Started: Open Textbook Network Publishing Cooperative

Coalition for Diversity and Inclusion releases Joint Statement of Principles | Library Publishing Coalition

From the LPC:

“A number of surveys in recent years have shed light on the lack of diversity in scholarly communications as whole.  Whether it is gender equality or the noticeable lack of ethnic diversity among our workforce, there is an awareness that, as an industry, we are not a model of inclusivity. Publishing is truly a global enterprise, yet in many respects, our workforce is very homogeneous and that is reflected in our own collective member demographics.

Representatives from these organizations met in Boston, MA, at the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) Annual Meeting in June 2017, to discuss challenges and current initiatives in progress to address the lack of diversity and inclusion within the industry. We agreed to continue discussions and collaborate on possible projects starting with a Joint Statement of Principles.”

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Source: Coalition for Diversity and Inclusion releases Joint Statement of Principles

Securing community-controlled infrastructure: SPARC’s plan of action | Joseph | College & Research Libraries News

From Heather Joseph via College & Research Libraries News (with thanks to The Idealis)

“Late last year, the news of Elsevier’s acquisition of bepress, the provider of the popular Digital Commons repository platform, sent a shockwave throughout the library community. Hundreds of institutions that use Digital Commons to support their open access repositories quite literally woke up to the news that their repository services are now owned and managed by a company that is well known for its obstruction of open access in the repository space.”

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Source: Securing community-controlled infrastructure: SPARC’s plan of action | Joseph | College & Research Libraries News

View of An Analysis of Academic Libraries’ Participation in 21st Century Library Trends | Evidence Based Library and Information Practice

From Catalano et al:

Abstract:

Objective – As academic libraries evolve to meet the changing needs of students in the digital age, the emphasis has shifted from the physical book collection to a suite of services incorporating innovations in teaching, technology, and social media, among others. Based on trends identified by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) and other sources, the authors investigated the extent to which academic libraries have adopted 21st century library trends.

Methods – The authors examined the websites of 100 Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries, their branches, and 160 randomly selected academic libraries to determine whether they adopted selected 21st century library trends.

Results – Results indicated that ARL member libraries were significantly more likely to adopt these trends, quite possibly due to their larger size and larger budgets.

Conclusion – This research can assist librarians, library directors, and other stakeholders in making the case for the adoption or avoidance of particular 21st century library trends, especially where considerable outlay of funds is necessary.

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Source: View of An Analysis of Academic Libraries’ Participation in 21st Century Library Trends | Evidence Based Library and Information Practice