Category: Institutional Repositories

More Scholarly Communications Consolidation as Institutional Repository Provider DuraSpace Merges into Lyrasis – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Roger C. Schonfeld via the Scholarly Kitchen:

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Source: More Scholarly Communications Consolidation as Institutional Repository Provider DuraSpace Merges into Lyrasis – The Scholarly Kitchen

Securing community-controlled infrastructure: SPARC’s plan of action | Joseph | College & Research Libraries News

From Heather Joseph via College & Research Libraries News (with thanks to The Idealis)

“Late last year, the news of Elsevier’s acquisition of bepress, the provider of the popular Digital Commons repository platform, sent a shockwave throughout the library community. Hundreds of institutions that use Digital Commons to support their open access repositories quite literally woke up to the news that their repository services are now owned and managed by a company that is well known for its obstruction of open access in the repository space.”

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Source: Securing community-controlled infrastructure: SPARC’s plan of action | Joseph | College & Research Libraries News

View of An Analysis of Academic Libraries’ Participation in 21st Century Library Trends | Evidence Based Library and Information Practice

From Catalano et al:

Abstract:

Objective – As academic libraries evolve to meet the changing needs of students in the digital age, the emphasis has shifted from the physical book collection to a suite of services incorporating innovations in teaching, technology, and social media, among others. Based on trends identified by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) and other sources, the authors investigated the extent to which academic libraries have adopted 21st century library trends.

Methods – The authors examined the websites of 100 Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries, their branches, and 160 randomly selected academic libraries to determine whether they adopted selected 21st century library trends.

Results – Results indicated that ARL member libraries were significantly more likely to adopt these trends, quite possibly due to their larger size and larger budgets.

Conclusion – This research can assist librarians, library directors, and other stakeholders in making the case for the adoption or avoidance of particular 21st century library trends, especially where considerable outlay of funds is necessary.

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Source: View of An Analysis of Academic Libraries’ Participation in 21st Century Library Trends | Evidence Based Library and Information Practice

Towards Open Access Self Archiving Policies: A Case Study of COAR | LIBER Quarterly

From Roy et al:

Abstract:
This paper examines Open Access (OA) self archiving policies of different Open Access Repositories (OARs) affiliated to COAR (Confederation of Open Access Repositories) as partner institutes. The process of scrutiny includes three major activities – selection of databases to consult; comparison and evaluation of Open Access policies of repositories listed in the selected databases and attached to COAR group; and critical examination of available self archiving policies of these OA repositories against a set of selected criteria. The above steps lead to reporting the following results: key findings have been identified and highlighted; common practices have been analyzed in relation to the focus of this paper; and a best practice benchmark has been suggested for popularizing and strengthening OARs as national research systems. This paper may help administrators, funding agencies, policy makers and professional librarians in devising institute-specific self archiving policies for their own organizations.

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Source: Towards Open Access Self Archiving Policies: A Case Study of COAR | LIBER Quarterly

Cornell University Library Repository Principles and Strategies Handbook

By Erin Faulder et al.:
Abstract

The handbook provides support for both new and existing repository managers, comprising both recommended practices and specifically identified action steps that will allow them to track their progress and identify gaps. Each section of the handbook covers a different strategic area of repository management, standing largely on its own and linking to other sections when appropriate. Although there is no primary section order, we recommend starting with Defining Repository Scope and Service Planning.

The handbook specifically addresses principles and practices pertaining to digital repositories, where a digital repository can be defined as: a system, the purpose of which is to store, present, and preserve a collection of data for which the library provides services. That is, the term refers specifically to the application as opposed to the content (collections, objects and metadata) within.

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Source: Cornell University Library Repository Principles and Strategies Handbook

DigitalCommons Users Discuss the bepress Acquisition

From a panel discussion at the Library Publishing Forum:

Abstract: Since the acquisition of the Berkeley Electronic Press (bepress) by Elsevier last summer, there has been much discussion online, in listserves, and elsewhere about what that development means for the future of open access and scholarly communications. The people most directly affected are the users of the bepress DigitalCommons repository hosting service. Some have recoiled in horror at the new ownership situation, others are waiting to see what happens next. This is a panel discussion by current users concerning what they see in the road ahead, including what they regard as essential services, possible options, functionality requirements, and necessary safeguards.

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Source: “DigitalCommons Users Discuss the bepress Acquisition” by Paul Royster, Roger Weaver et al.

JLSC Board Editorial 2018 | Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication

From Clement et al. via the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication:

Abstract:

The current scholarly communication landscape is populated by a variety of actors and powered by an ever-increasing array of complementary and competitive systems for the production, publication, and distribution of scholarship. Recent years have also seen increasing numbers of proposals to recast these systems in ways that better align with the needs and values of the academy and its scholars. In this editorial, members of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication consider the present environment and contemplate the future of academy-owned and -supported scholarly communication, as well as the role of libraries in that future.

Read the editorial here:
Source: JLSC Board Editorial 2018

Southern Miss Institutional Repository Conference

From Josh Cromwell at University of Southern Mississippi Libraries:

If you were not able to attend the 2018 Southern Miss Institutional Repository Conference this year, the slides and/or posters from the majority of the presentations are now available! In addition, most sessions also include community notes, which were taken by the attendees in each session.

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Source: 2018 | Southern Miss Institutional Repository Conference