Category: Open Access

Are Mirror Journals Just Hybrid Open Access Journals In Disguise Or Are They A Viable Route To The Open Access Future? | A Way of Happening

From Ryan Regier in A Way of Happening: A Research Library Blog:

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“Developments in the open access world seem to be moving at a lightning pace lately. Plan S has added a realism and urgency to OA discussions. Never to be behind on any ‘scholcomm’ development, Elsevier has started a pilot program of launching what they are calling ‘Mirror Journals’.  Open Access (OA) ‘copies’ of existing peer reviewed journals. Journals that are “fully gold open access but share the same editorial board, aims and scope and peer review policies as their existing “parent” journals – and the same level of visibility and discoverability.”

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Source: Are Mirror Journals Just Hybrid Open Access Journals In Disguise Or Are They A Viable Route To The Open Access Future? | A Way of Happening

Researcher to Reader (R2R) Debate: Is Sci-Hub Good or Bad for Scholarly Communication? – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Rick Anderson in The Scholarly Kitchen:

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“One plenary session of the 2019 Researcher to Reader (R2R) Conference was a debate on the proposition “Resolved: Sci-Hub is doing more good than harm to scholarly communication.” Arguing in favor of the resolution was Daniel Himmelstein, a postdoctoral fellow in genomics at the University of Pennsylvania. Arguing against it was Justin Spence, partner and co-founder of PSI Ltd., and the IP Registry.”

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Source: Researcher to Reader (R2R) Debate: Is Sci-Hub Good or Bad for Scholarly Communication? – The Scholarly Kitchen

Open Access Toolkit: DARIAH’s practical recommendations to promote Open Access within the arts and humanities – DARIAH Open

From Erzsébet Tóth-Czifra Laurent Romary in DARIAH Open:

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Where can I find Open Access journals in my field? When and how can I share my article as a preprint? Does publishing Open Access necessarily involve paying processing charges? These are just some of the questions we are asking from ourselves when exploring the options for open dissemination of our research. In this post, which is the second part of our Open Access in the humanities blog series, we bring together recommendations, tools, platforms and other resources that you may find helpful in answering these questions. All of them are available for everyone, regardless of geographical or disciplinary background, and can be directly and easily included in the publishing workflows of our communities.

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Source: Open Access Toolkit: DARIAH’s practical recommendations to promote Open Access within the arts and humanities – DARIAH Open

Researching Rumors About Open Access Dissertations | Authors Alliance

From Jill Cirasella and Polly Thistlethwaite in the Author’s Alliance Latest News:

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For years, we have encouraged researchers at our institution, the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, to consider the benefits—for others, themselves, and their fields of study—of making their scholarship available open access. In doing so, we have found allies, some already committed to open access and some newly swayed by our arguments.

But, like many librarians advocating openness, we have also met resistance—disinclination to make time to upload works to repositories, confusion about variations among publishers’ policies regarding authors’ rights, certainty that niche work has no broader audience, concern about the viability of scholarly societies in an open-access world, etc.

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Source: Researching Rumors About Open Access Dissertations | Authors Alliance

University of California cancels deal with Elsevier after months of negotiations | Inside Higher Ed

From Lindsay McKenzie in Inside Higher Ed:

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The University of California System has canceled its multimillion-dollar subscription contract with Elsevier, an academic publisher.

Other institutions have canceled their “big deal” journal subscription contracts with major publishers before. But none in the U.S. have the financial and scholarly clout of the UC system — which accounts for nearly 10 percent of the nation’s publishing output.

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Source: University of California cancels deal with Elsevier after months of negotiations

Taking Stock of the Feedback on Plan S Implementation Guidance – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe in The Scholarly Kitchen:

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Like many others, I found myself reading response after response after response to cOAlition S’ call for feedback on the Guidance on the Implementation of Plan S last week. The volume of response is staggering. Statements have poured in from individual and groups — publishers, scholarly societies, disciplinary repositories, scholarly communications platforms, funding agencies, publishing professionals, libraries, library associations, and researchers themselves. As the deadline drew near on Friday, I could hardly “right click/open link in new tab” fast enough as my Twitter feed scrolled by. The input from Norway alone has reached 885 pages. The Open Access Tracking Project currently has almost 400 documents tagged oa.plan_s. reddit Open Science and Scholia/wikidata have also been tracking replies. One imagines that there is feedback that has not been shared publicly as well.

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Source: Taking Stock of the Feedback on Plan S Implementation Guidance – The Scholarly Kitchen

Open Access Is Going Mainstream. Here’s Why That Could Transform Academic Life. – The Chronicle of Higher Education

From Lindsay Ellis in the Chronicle for Higher Education:

Debate over the future of scholarly publishing felt remote to Kathryn M. Jones, an associate professor of biology at Florida State University — that is, until she attended a Faculty Senate meeting last year.

There she learned that the library might renegotiate its $2-million subscription with the publishing behemoth Elsevier, which would limit her and her colleagues’ access to groundbreaking research. Horror sank in. Like other experimental scientists, Jones regularly skims articles published in subscription journals to plan future experiments. What would happen if she couldn’t access that body of important work with the click of a button?

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Source: Open Access Is Going Mainstream. Here’s Why That Could Transform Academic Life. – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Publishers express concern about unintended consequences of Plan S | Inside Higher Ed

From Lindsay McKenzie in Inside Higher Ed:

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The goal of Plan S is simple — make all publicly funded research immediately available to the public. It’s a goal many universities, research funders and academics say they support. The problem is agreeing on how to get there, and who should pay for it.

flurry of documents published by publishers, research funders, scholarly societies and academics earlier this month in response to a call for feedback on Plan S highlight just how little agreement there is about how to implement the European open-access initiative, which could impact scholarly publishing practices worldwide.

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Source: Publishers express concern about unintended consequences of Plan S

Learned Publishing : Vol 32 , No 1 | Wiley Online Library

From Learned Publishing:

“In recognition of this 30th year of Learned Publishing, we invited contributions from a wide diversity of contributors who could bring an evidence base and fresh thinking to some of our most dearly held beliefs and current topics of debate.”

Browse the table of contents here:

Source: Learned Publishing : Vol 32 , No 1

Open Access 2018: A Year of Funders and Universities Drawing Lines in the Sand | Absolutely Maybe

From Hilda Bastian via Absolutely Maybe:

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“This is the sixth year I’ve rounded up the year in open access – and it was the most remarkable. When the year began, the world’s largest academic publisher, Elsevier, had increased their annual profits, with an operating profit approaching US$1.2 billion in science, technology, and medicine – a profit margin of over 36%. [PDF] By year’s end, a hefty chunk of the world’s research community was walking away from big subscription deals with Elsevier and others.”

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Source: Open Access 2018: A Year of Funders and Universities Drawing Lines in the Sand | Absolutely Maybe