Category: Open Access

Differentiating Between Open Access and Open Educational Resources | VTechWorks

From Anita Walz:

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Differentiating open access and open educational resource can be a challenge in some contexts. Excellent resources such as “How Open Is It?: A Guide for Evaluating the Openness of Journals” (CC BY) https://sparcopen.org/our-work/howopenisit created by SPARC, PLOS, and OASPA greatly aid us in understanding the relative openness of journals. However, visual resources to conceptually differentiate open educational resources (OER) from resources disseminated using an open access approach do not currently exist. Until now.
This one page introductory guide differentiates OER and OA materials on the basis of purpose (teaching vs. research), method of access (analog and digital), and in terms of the relative freedoms offered by different levels of Creative Commons licenses, the most common open license. Many other open licenses, including open software licenses also exist.

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Source: Differentiating Between Open Access and Open Educational Resources

OA in the Open: Community Needs and Perspectives | LIS Scholarship Archive Works |

From Rebecca Kennison, Judy Ruttenberg, Yasmeen Shorish, and Liz Thompson in LIS Scholarship Archive Works:

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The National Forum described here was proposed as a first step in surfacing community requirements and principles toward a collective open access (OA) collection development system. The Forum asked participants to envision a collective funding environment for libraries to contribute provisioning or sustaining funds to OA content providers. A critical component of this project was to bring together groups of interested and invested individuals with different priorities and perspectives and begin to build a community of engagement and dialogue. By analyzing focus group feedback and leveraging the insights and interactions of participants, this paper presents the challenges, opportunities, and potential next steps for building an OA collection development model and culture based on a community of collective action.

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Source: LIS Scholarship Archive Works | OA in the Open: Community Needs and Perspectives

A 21st Century Solution to the Serials Crisis: White paper | Scholastica

From Scholastica:

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As the cost of academic journals continues to rise, institutions and individual scholars are increasingly at risk of losing access to leading research. Time is running out to break this dangerous cycle. This white paper brings together key literature and insights from 5 expert open access (OA) advocates to survey the journal publishing landscape and explore ways research can affordably be made OA. The paper argues the keys to an OA future are: decentralization of the journal market, online-only publishing, and democratization of article production via services.

The paper overviews:

  • The past and present state of journal publishing
  • Current alternatives to the corporate publisher model
  • Steps to realize sustainable, open access-friendly journal models

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Source: A 21st Century Solution to the Serials Crisis: White paper

Blurring Lines — Considering the Future of Discovery, Access and Business Models in Support of Virtual Reality Content for Scholarly Research and Classroom Learning:  What Can We Learn from the Rise of OER and OA?  – Against The Grain

From David Parker in Against the Grain:in:

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The open educational resources (OER) movement began in the years between 1999 and 2002, during which time Rice launched its precursor to OpenStax and UNESCO’S 2002 forum on open courseware coined the term OER.; Since these early days the pace of growth in adoption of OER, while unsatisfying to some activists, has been, in my view, phenomenal. Studies, such as Opening the Textbook by Julia E. Seaman and Jeff Seaman from the Babson Survey Research Group, reported in 2017 that the OER adoption rate for large enrollment courses was 16.5%.  And when I attended OpenEd 18 this past fall in Niagara Falls, New York, I was astounded by the number of attendees and, most specifically, by the numbers of librarians in formal or informal support roles for OER at their institutions.

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Source: v31 #3 Blurring Lines — Considering the Future of Discovery, Access and Business Models in Support of Virtual Reality Content for Scholarly Research and Classroom Learning:  What Can We Learn from the Rise of OER and OA?  – Against The Grain

OhioLINK Wiley Open Access FAQ | OhioLINK

From OhioLINK:

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OhioLINK and Wiley are very pleased to pilot a consortial-level open access initiative. Because of the nature of our consortium and the active engagement of our membership in decision making, some details of the exact nature of decision-making, allocation of central funding, and policies about exactly what to fund (gold OA, hybrid, etc.) will emerge over the next few months. For now, we believe it’s important to share all information currently available with our membership. We’ve done our best to both answer questions and anticipate those yet to be posed.

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Source: OhioLINK Wiley Open Access FAQ | OhioLINK

The future of scholarly books is open (access) | Group | Springer Nature

From Springer Nature:

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The majority of book authors support the idea that all future scholarly books should be open access (OA). This is one of the key findings of a new white paper presented by Springer Nature at the OAI-11 conference at CERN this week. Based on the responses of 2,542 book authors who were surveyed by Springer Nature in February and March 2019, the white paper provides a global view of book authors’ attitudes towards OA. The survey looks at researchers’ motivations for publishing a book, and analyses the parameters and key drivers which influence academics to publish OA or not. The white paper also identifies major obstacles to OA publication which book authors still face: from a lack of awareness of OA publishing options and low funding, to concerns about how OA books are perceived. The white paper is freely available for download.

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2019 ACRL Environmental Scan Released – ACRL Insider

From Mary Jane Petrowski in ACRL Insider:

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Every two years, the ACRL Research Planning and Review Committee releases an environmental scan of higher education, including developments with the potential for continuing impact on academic libraries. The 2019 Environmental Scan (PDF) provides a broad review of the current higher education landscape, with special focus on the state of academic and research libraries.

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Source: 2019 ACRL Environmental Scan Released – ACRL Insider

Preparing for Plan S: Answers to the top 10 journal publisher FAQs we’ve heard based on what is known now | Scholastica

From the Scholastica blog:

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For publishers, ready or not, Plan S is coming (which is fitting given that the S really stands for “shock,” as well as “science,” “speed,” and “solution”). If you still have questions about what Plan S is exactly and how it will affect the journals you publish or work with, you’re not alone. Here at Scholastica, we’ve been getting a lot of questions from our journal users about the overall aims of Plan S and the technical specifications. We decided to compile this FAQ blog post to provide answers to some of the most common questions we’ve heard based on the information available right now.

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Source: Preparing for Plan S: Answers to the top 10 journal publisher FAQs we’ve heard based on what is known now

Open-Access Monographs: New Tools, More Access | EDUCAUSE

From Monica McCormick in Educause Review:

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We are in an era of significant change in the United States and Canada for publishing open-access (OA) scholarly monographs. Since most monographs are published by university presses, and most copies are purchased by research libraries, this article focuses on that community. The bulk of OA titles are older or out-of-print works, many funded by the Mellon/NEH Humanities Open Book (HOB) program, which enabled free access to backlist scholarly works. Under that program, about 2,500 books from 28 publishers are now OA. Meanwhile, new OA-only book publishers are, together with traditional scholarly presses and libraries, exploring innovative business models and technologies.

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Source: Open-Access Monographs: New Tools, More Access | EDUCAUSE

Guest Post: Evaluating Open Access in a Consortial Context – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Gwen Evans in The Scholarly Kitchen:

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As several recent announcements and initiatives have shown, Open Access (OA) negotiations between libraries and publishers are complex, in a constant state of flux, and provide little predictability — and OA models and negotiations within library consortia contain complexities all their own. One of the key questions library consortia have to ask themselves is, Are you a Publish or a Read library consortium, or somewhere in between? As Lisa Hinchliffe’s recent primer on transformative agreements notes, the implications of Publish and Read versus Read and Publish are different for different consortia.

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Source: Guest Post: Evaluating Open Access in a Consortial Context – The Scholarly Kitchen