Category: Open Access

An A-Z list of scholarly publishing and open science platforms – BMJ Digital

From BMJ Digital:

Inspired by Ian Mulvany’s tweet about Vega Academic Publishing System (which does look interesting, especially the partnership with Oslo School of Architecture and Design). We thought we would publish the list of publishing platforms that we keep an eye on.  The list is a bit of a jumble and includes a number of platforms like Aletheia, PubPub and Authorea aimed at authors who want to self-publish. A number of open science initiatives like Pluto Network, Lab Scribbles and the open archive HAL. Publishers like Elsevier and SpringerNature who run their own platforms but don’t open them up to other publishers aren’t listed. 

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Source: An A-Z list of scholarly publishing and open science platforms (Updated 6 November 2018) – BMJ Digital

The Open Access Citation Advantage: Does It Exist and What Does It Mean for Libraries? | Lewis | Information Technology and Libraries

From Colby Lewis via Information Technology and Libraries:

“The last literature review of research on the existence of an open access citation advantage (OACA)
was published in 2011 by Philip M. Davis and William H. Walters. This paper reexamines the
conclusions reached by Davis and Walters by providing a critical review of OACA literature that has
been published since 2011 and explores how increases in open access publication trends could serve
as a leveraging tool for libraries against the high costs of journal subscriptions.”

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Source: The Open Access Citation Advantage: Does It Exist and What Does It Mean for Libraries? | Lewis | Information Technology and Libraries

Getting Started: Open Textbook Network Publishing Cooperative

From the OTN:

“More and more, there is interest in supporting faculty authors in creating open textbooks for higher education. This course is designed to be pragmatic support for open textbook publishing programs, often led by librarians. Instructional designers, technologists and people who work at university presses may also be involved.

You’re invited to move through this course in whatever way works best for you. That said, it is organized in what we think is a sensible chronological order. So, if you’re not sure where to start, start at the beginning!”

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Source: Getting Started: Open Textbook Network Publishing Cooperative