Category: Open Access

The Quest to Topple Science-Stymying Academic Paywalls | WIRED

From Joi Ito via Wired:

Preview:

“SCIENCE IS BUILT, enhanced, and developed through the open and structured sharing of knowledge. Yet some publishers charge so much for subscriptions to their academic journals that even the libraries of the world’s wealthiest universities such as Harvard are no longer able to afford the prices. Those publishers’ profit margins rival those of the most profitable companies in the world, even though research is largely underwritten by governments, and the publishers don’t pay authors and researchers or the peer reviewers who evaluate those works. How is such an absurd structure able to sustain itself—and how might we change it?”

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Source: The Quest to Topple Science-Stymying Academic Paywalls | WIRED

Large Scale Publisher Survey reveals Global Trends in Open Access Publishing – News Service

From the DOAJ News Service:

“A survey of publishers with journals indexed in DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals) has revealed surprising trends in the way that content is published; what types of organisations are publishing the content; on how publishing standards are being accepted globally; and geographical trends on the uptake of open access.

The survey was sent out by DOAJ to its 6000+ account holders, that is to say publishers, in the Summer of 2018. Account holders were allowed one response each, regardless of how many journals they have in that account and all accounts have at least 1 journal active in DOAJ. The total number of responses returned was 1065. Answers revealed some interesting facts, especially when compared to answers provided in the last publisher survey carried out in 2013.”

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Source: Large Scale Publisher Survey reveals Global Trends in Open Access Publishing – News Service

Community Code: Supporting the Mission of Open Access and Preservation with the Use of Open Source Library Technologies | Florida State University Libraries

From Keila Zayas-Ruiz and Mark Baggett via Florida State University Libraries:

“As librarians, we serve as champions for equal access and preservation of materials, both scholarly and cultural in significance. One of the core missions of libraries is access. Due to increased demand for scholarly articles and the technological advances of the internet, open access is quickly becoming a major priority among research libraries today. It “has expanded the possibilities for disseminating one’s own research and accessing that of others.” The movement of open access aligns closely with the ALA core value of access as outlined by the ALA council: “All information resources that are provided directly or indirectly by the library, regardless of technology, format, or methods of delivery, should be readily, equally, and equitably accessible to all library users.” It has gained considerable momentum in recent years among librarians in institutions of higher education, spurring funds dedicated to support authors who wish to publish in open access journals, the creation of library-run online open access journals, and open access mandates for faculty members.”

Source: Community Code: Supporting the Mission of Open Access and Preservation with the Use of Open Source Library Technologies | Florida State University Libraries

 

 

The First Step Towards a System of Open Digital Scholarly Communication Infrastructure – IO: In The Open

From David W. Lewis, Mike Roy, and Katherine Skinner via In the Open

“We are working on a project to map the infrastructure required to support digital scholarly communications.  This project is an outgrowth of David W. Lewis’ “2.5% Commitment” proposal.

Even in the early stages of this effort we have had to confront several uncomfortable truths.”

Read more here:

Source: The First Step Towards a System of Open Digital Scholarly Communication Infrastructure – IO: In The Open

Plan S: A Mandate for Gold OA with Lots of Strings Attached – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Angela Cochran via the Scholarly Kitchen:

“Over the past several weeks, many in the scholarly publishing world have been reacting to the open access (OA) 10 principles outlined by cOAlition S — a plan now referred to as “Plan S”. The principles laid out were interesting but lacked significant detail leading to loads of conversations trying to imagine what an implementation might look like.

Last week the “implementation plan” for Plan S compliance was posted. The biggest questions going in were whether they would really disallow hybrid models and what the proposed the APC cap would look like.”

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Source: Plan S: A Mandate for Gold OA with Lots of Strings Attached – The Scholarly Kitchen

Learning Lessons from DPLA – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Roger Schonfeld via The Scholarly Kitchen:

“DPLA — the Digital Public Library of America — last week laid off six members of its small staff. Over the weekend, DPLA executive director John Bracken, in a talk at the LITA Forum, provided an overview of DPLA’s vision, which appears to include a change in strategic direction. DPLA is a not-for-profit organization with a strong board including library leaders Brian Bannon of Chicago Public, Chris Bourg of MIT, and Denise Stephens of Washington University St. Louis, Oxford University Press’s Niko Pfund, and Wikimedia CEO Katherine Maher, among others. DPLA launched five years ago, with a strategy focused on aggregating and curating special collections and a technical approach that made sense for the web that was celebrated here in the Kitchen. It now appears to be pivoting more towards ebook distribution systems. It is also clearly facing some difficulties right now. “

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Source: Learning Lessons from DPLA – The Scholarly Kitchen

An A-Z list of scholarly publishing and open science platforms – BMJ Digital

From BMJ Digital:

Inspired by Ian Mulvany’s tweet about Vega Academic Publishing System (which does look interesting, especially the partnership with Oslo School of Architecture and Design). We thought we would publish the list of publishing platforms that we keep an eye on.  The list is a bit of a jumble and includes a number of platforms like Aletheia, PubPub and Authorea aimed at authors who want to self-publish. A number of open science initiatives like Pluto Network, Lab Scribbles and the open archive HAL. Publishers like Elsevier and SpringerNature who run their own platforms but don’t open them up to other publishers aren’t listed. 

Read more here:

Source: An A-Z list of scholarly publishing and open science platforms (Updated 6 November 2018) – BMJ Digital

The Open Access Citation Advantage: Does It Exist and What Does It Mean for Libraries? | Lewis | Information Technology and Libraries

From Colby Lewis via Information Technology and Libraries:

“The last literature review of research on the existence of an open access citation advantage (OACA)
was published in 2011 by Philip M. Davis and William H. Walters. This paper reexamines the
conclusions reached by Davis and Walters by providing a critical review of OACA literature that has
been published since 2011 and explores how increases in open access publication trends could serve
as a leveraging tool for libraries against the high costs of journal subscriptions.”

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Source: The Open Access Citation Advantage: Does It Exist and What Does It Mean for Libraries? | Lewis | Information Technology and Libraries

Getting Started: Open Textbook Network Publishing Cooperative

From the OTN:

“More and more, there is interest in supporting faculty authors in creating open textbooks for higher education. This course is designed to be pragmatic support for open textbook publishing programs, often led by librarians. Instructional designers, technologists and people who work at university presses may also be involved.

You’re invited to move through this course in whatever way works best for you. That said, it is organized in what we think is a sensible chronological order. So, if you’re not sure where to start, start at the beginning!”

Read more here:
Source: Getting Started: Open Textbook Network Publishing Cooperative