Category: Open Access

Securing community-controlled infrastructure: SPARC’s plan of action | Joseph | College & Research Libraries News

From Heather Joseph via College & Research Libraries News (with thanks to The Idealis)

“Late last year, the news of Elsevier’s acquisition of bepress, the provider of the popular Digital Commons repository platform, sent a shockwave throughout the library community. Hundreds of institutions that use Digital Commons to support their open access repositories quite literally woke up to the news that their repository services are now owned and managed by a company that is well known for its obstruction of open access in the repository space.”

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Source: Securing community-controlled infrastructure: SPARC’s plan of action | Joseph | College & Research Libraries News

Towards Open Access Self Archiving Policies: A Case Study of COAR | LIBER Quarterly

From Roy et al:

Abstract:
This paper examines Open Access (OA) self archiving policies of different Open Access Repositories (OARs) affiliated to COAR (Confederation of Open Access Repositories) as partner institutes. The process of scrutiny includes three major activities – selection of databases to consult; comparison and evaluation of Open Access policies of repositories listed in the selected databases and attached to COAR group; and critical examination of available self archiving policies of these OA repositories against a set of selected criteria. The above steps lead to reporting the following results: key findings have been identified and highlighted; common practices have been analyzed in relation to the focus of this paper; and a best practice benchmark has been suggested for popularizing and strengthening OARs as national research systems. This paper may help administrators, funding agencies, policy makers and professional librarians in devising institute-specific self archiving policies for their own organizations.

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Source: Towards Open Access Self Archiving Policies: A Case Study of COAR | LIBER Quarterly

Vol 19 No 2 (2018): Gifts of a global church | Vision: A Journal for Church and Theology

Now available on the PALNI Press Open Journal Systems platform:

From the editorial:

What does it mean to be a global church? What does it mean to be Mennonite, given the reality of our church, of our historical sins and great global differences?

All the authors [in this issue] are convinced that participating in a global church gifts us, gifts us all, with community, and so with possibilities for mutual learning and a shared life in faith. The challenges to forming and sustaining global church relationships are great, and require us to face the legacies of colonialism and economic dependence, as well as our deep linguistic and cultural differences. But the reward is considerable: God’s gift to us, each other.

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Source: Vol 19 No 2 (2018): Gifts of a global church | Vision: A Journal for Church and Theology

Project MUSE: 300 “HTML5″ Open Access Books Now Available on the Redesigned MUSE Platform | LJ infoDOCKET

From Gary Price via Library Journal Info Docket”

Nearly 300 open access (OA) books are now available from Project MUSE, the highly-acclaimed online collection of humanities and social science scholarship, on a newly designed platform that represents a major step forward in OA publishing in these fields.

The books will be delivered in a highly-discoverable and adaptable format using user-friendly HTML5, rather than static PDFs, and will include titles from Johns Hopkins University Press, Cornell University Press, Duke University Press, University of Hawai’i Press, University of Michigan Press, Syracuse University Press, The MIT Press, and Temple University Press.

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Source: Project MUSE: 300 “HTML5″ Open Access Books Now Available on the Redesigned MUSE Platform | LJ infoDOCKET

Links to Presentations and Posters From the 10th Conference on Open Access Scholarly Publishing (COASP) | LJ infoDOCKET

From Gary Price via Library Journal Info Docket:

“The 10th Conference on Open Access Scholarly Publishing (#COASP10) concludes today in Vienna, Austria. We’ve been posting links to presentations and posters as we have learned about them. We plan to continue to update this post. Please bookmark and stop by again.”

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Source: Links to Presentations and Posters From the 10th Conference on Open Access Scholarly Publishing (COASP) | LJ infoDOCKET

Response to Plan S from Academic Researchers: Unethical, Too Risky! | For Better Science

From Leonind Schneider via For Better Science:

“By announcing a radical and controversial Plan S, the European Union has created facts on the ground with Open Access (OA), which is to become Gold standard (pun intended) by the year 2020. I am honoured to present you, exclusively on my site, an Appeal by several European scientists protesting against Plan S, which they fear will deprive them of quality journal venues and of international collaborative opportunities, while disadvantaging scientists whose research budgets preclude paying and playing in this OA league. The appeal authors around the Sweden-based scientist Lynn Kamerlin offer instead their own suggestions how to implement Open Science.” 

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Source: Response to Plan S from Academic Researchers: Unethical, Too Risky! – For Better Science

MIT Open Access Task Force releases white paper | MIT News

From MIT News:

“The ad hoc task force on open access to MIT’s research has released “Open Access at MIT and Beyond: A White Paper of the MIT Ad Hoc Task Force on Open Access to MIT’s Research,” which examines efforts to make research and scholarship openly and freely available. The white paper provides a backdrop to the ongoing work of the task force: identifying new, updated, or revised open access policies and practices that might advance the Institute’s mission to share its knowledge with the world.” 

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Source: MIT Open Access Task Force releases white paper | MIT News

Open access — the movie | Nature

From Richard Poynder via Nature:

“Billed as a documentary, Paywall would be more accurately described as an advocacy film. Its intention seems to be to persuade viewers that the paywalls that restrict access to journal content online are an unnecessary hangover from the print era, and now serve only to perpetuate the excessive profits that legacy publishers such as Elsevier, Wiley and Springer Nature make from the public purse.

The film makes a convincing case that the paywall system creates problems — and that universal open access (OA) to scholarly articles would be better for society. But it fails to adequately explore the thorny challenges that arise with OA publishing.”

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Source: Open access — the movie | Nature

cOAlition S | Science Europe

From Science Europe:

“On 4 September 2018, 11 national research funding organisation, with the support of the European Commission including the European Research Council (ERC), announced the launch of cOAlition S, an initiative to make full and immediate Open Access to research publications a reality. It is built around Plan S, which consists of one target and 10 principles.

cOAlition S signals the commitment to implement, by 1 January 2020, the necessary measures to fulfil its main principle: By 2020 scientific publications that result from research funded by public grants provided by participating national and European research councils and funding bodies, must be published in compliant Open Access Journals or on compliant Open Access Platforms.”

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Source: Science Europe – cOAlition S

Foundations for Open Scholarship Strategy Development | Tennant et al.

From Jon Tennant et al.:

“The purpose of this document is to provide a concise analysis of where the global Open Scholarship movement currently stands: what the common threads and strengths are, where the greatest opportunities and challenges lie, and how we can more effectively work together as a global community to recognise the top strategic priorities. This document was inspired by the Foundations for OER Strategy Development and work in the FORCE11 Scholarly Commons Working Group, and developed by an open contribution working group.”

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Source: Foundations for Open Scholarship Strategy Development