Category: Open Access

Focusing on Value – 102 Things Journal Publishers Do (2018 Update) – The Scholarly Kitchen

From the Scholarly Kitchen:

“The first version of this list was created back in the summer of 2012, at a time when publishers were being challenged repeatedly to prove they added value beyond managing peer review and some basic copy editing and formatting….This update is a reframing and expansion of the list. I’ve changed the motif from the cost perspective (expense, level of difficulty, and duration) to the value perspective (uniqueness, value, importance). The list has always been implicitly a list of things journal publishers do, so this year I’ve made that explicit in the headline. “

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Source: Focusing on Value – 102 Things Journal Publishers Do (2018 Update) – The Scholarly Kitchen

Format Aside: Applying Beall’s Criteria to Assess the Predatory Nature of both OA and Non-OA Library and Information Science Journals | Olivarez | College & Research Libraries

From CR&L (with thanks to The Idealis):

“Abstract: Jeffrey Beall’s blog listing of potential predatory journals and publishers, as well as his Criteria for Determining Predatory Open-Access (OA) Publishers are often looked at as tools to help researchers avoid publishing in predatory journals. While these Criteria has brought a greater awareness of OA predatory journals, these tools alone should not be used as the only source in determining the quality of a scholarly journal….”

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Source: Format Aside: Applying Beall’s Criteria to Assess the Predatory Nature of both OA and Non-OA Library and Information Science Journals | Olivarez | College & Research Libraries

Of note in College and Research Libraries News Vol 78, No 11 (2017)

There are several Scholarly Communications related topics in the latest issue of C&RL news:

The University of Southern California Voltaire Letters: A polymathic multimodal digital project

Danielle Mihram

Textbooks on open reserve: A pilot project

Dolores Skowronek

Beyond buttonology: Digital humanities, digital pedagogy, and the ACRL Framework

John E. Russell, Merinda Kaye Hensley

Open access, power, and privilege: A response to “What I learned from predatory publishing”

Shea Swauger

Read more here:

Source: Vol 78, No 11 (2017)

Open Access: What should the priorities be today? | Open and Shut

From the Open and Shut blog by Richard Poynder:

This year marks the 15th anniversary of the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI), the meeting that led to the launch of the open access movement, and which defined open access thus:

“By ‘open access’ to this literature, we mean its free availability on the public internet, permitting any users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of these articles, crawl them for indexing, pass them as data to software, or use them for any other lawful purpose, without financial, legal, or technical barriers other than those inseparable from gaining access to the internet itself. The only constraint on reproduction and distribution, and the only role for copyright in this domain, should be to give authors control over the integrity of their work and the right to be properly acknowledged and cited.”

A great deal of water has passed under the bridge since 2002, but as 2017 draws to an end what should the stakeholders of scholarly communication be doing now to fully realise the vision outlined at the Budapest meeting? That is a question I have been putting to a number of people, inviting them to say what they believe the priorities should be going forward for the following stakeholders: researchers, research institutions, research funders, politicians and governments, librarians and publishers.

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Source: Open and Shut?: Open Access: What should the priorities be today?

OJS is not for sale | Public Knowledge Project

From Kevin at PKP:

With the recent acquisition of bepress by multinational publishing giant Elsevier, we’ve been asked by a number of people, some in jest, others less so, if OJS is next, given its substantial share of the journal platform market. As the title of this piece indicates, OJS is most definitely not for sale.

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Source: OJS is not for sale | Public Knowledge Project

Federal Trade Commission and National Institutes of Health Take Action Against Predatory Publishing Practices – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Rick Anderson via the Scholarly Kitchen:

In an interesting and potentially significant move for the scholarly publishing world, the U.S. District Court for the District of Nevada has granted a preliminary injunction against a major journal publisher and conference organizer in response to a complaint by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). The injunction was granted on the basis of the Court’s analysis of evidence provided by the FTC and its finding that the FTC’s complaint, if allowed to proceed, “is likely to succeed on the merits” and that the public interest would be served by granting it.

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Source: Federal Trade Commission and National Institutes of Health Take Action Against Predatory Publishing Practices – The Scholarly Kitchen

Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication Volume 5, General Issue – new articles

Source: Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication

Books and the OA effect: One publisher’s perspective – OASPA

From Ros Pyne, Head of Policy and Development, Open Research at Springer Nature

Where there are undeniable challenges in introducing a sustainable OA books model, we also see opportunities to drive open access forward and advance discovery through experimentation. As of October 2017, Springer Nature has published more than 400 open access books on SpringerLink, from our SpringerOpen and Palgrave Macmillan imprints. This means that we have a solid and growing dataset from which to investigate the so-called ‘OA effect’.

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Source: Books and the OA effect: One publisher’s perspective – OASPA

Who posted all those articles to ResearchGate anyway? | Scholarly Communications @ Duke

From David Hansen, J.D.:

You may have heard about recent legal action against ResearchGate brought by several large academic publishers organized under name of the “Coalition for Responsible Sharing” (Elsevier, Wiley, Wolters Kluwer, Brill, and ACS). Some of its members filed a lawsuit against ResearchGate and sent ResearchGate copyright takedown notices for many articles posted there. There are some good summaries of the dispute already, including this one by Mike Wolfe at UC Davis and this one on Science Magazine Online.

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Source: Scholarly Communications @ Duke – Discussions about the changing world of scholarly communications and copyright

A Look Back at Open Access Week 2017 | ACRL TechConnect

From Margaret Heller via ACRL TechConnect Blog:

This year’s Open Access Week at my institution was a bit different than before. With our time constrained by conference travel and staff shortages leaving everyone over-scheduled, we decided to aim for a week of “virtual programming”, with a week of blog posts and an invitation to view our open access research guide. While this lacked the splashiness of programming in prior years, in another way it felt important to do this work in this way. Yes, it may well be that only people already well-connected to the library saw any of this material. But promotion of open access requires a great deal of self-education among librarians or other library insiders before we can promote it more broadly. For many libraries, it may be the case that there are only a few “open access” people, and Open Access Week ends up being the only time during the year the topic is addressed by the library as a whole.

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Source: A Look Back at Open Access Week 2017