Category: Open Source

Can we transform scholarly communication with open source and community‐owned infrastructure?|Learned Publishing

From Alison McGonagle‐O’Connell and Kristen Ratanin in Learned Publishing:

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When it comes to infrastructure, scholarly publishing has been slow to evolve, and recent consolidation has weakened the competitive landscape. Publishers are waking up to learn that their most valuable asset – their publishing pipeline and accompanying workflow data – is suddenly owned by a potentially competitive organization whose values may not align with their own. Options to break away are challenging due to contracts, vendor lock in, and migration costs.

When consolidation occurred in content, as larger publishers acquired smaller publishers, costs went up. The increasing consolidation in technology and services will likely drive the costs of the current platform vendors up as well and offer fewer choices. Small‐ and mid‐sized publishers are faced with a decision to try and operate independently or partner with commercial publishers or vendors. These partnerships increasingly challenge their core values, such as independence and autonomy, research‐driven mission and goals, and control over business models and workflow.

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Source: Can we transform scholarly communication with open source and community‐owned infrastructure? – McGonagle‐O’Connell – 2019 – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

Announcing “Mind the Gap,” a major report on all available open-source publishing software | The MIT Press

From the MIT Press:

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Mellon-funded report Mind the Gap: A Landscape Analysis of Open Source Publishing Tools and Platforms catalogs and analyzes all available open-source software for publishing and warns that open publishing must grapple with the dual challenges of siloed development and organization of the community-owned ecosystem

The MIT Press is pleased to release Mind the Gap: A Landscape Analysis of Open Source Publishing Tools and Platforms (openly published at mindthegap.pubpub.org), a major report on the current state of all available open-source software for publishing. Funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the report “shed[s] light on the development and deployment of open-source publishing technologies in order to aid institutions’ and individuals’ decision-making and project planning.” It will be an unparalleled resource for the scholarly publishing community and complements the recently released Mapping the Scholarly Communication Landscape census.

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Source: Announcing “Mind the Gap,” a major report on all available open-source publishing software | The MIT Press

Why Are So Many Scholarly Communication Infrastructure Providers Running a Red Queen’s Race? | Educopia Institute

From Katherine Skinner in Educopia Institute Community Cultivators:

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A few weeks ago, we at Educopia published the first project deliverable for the “Mapping Scholarly Communication Infrastructure” project, which we’re working on with Middlebury College and TrueBearing Consulting. The deliverable is a report and a set of data visualizations based on our deep dive into the organizational and technical infrastructures of “Scholarly Communication Resources,” (SCRs) or the tools, platforms, and services that undergird and support today’s digital knowledge infrastructures.

The report details our project team’s findings from the Census of Scholarly Communication Infrastructure Providers—a survey we ran this spring (and have recently reopened with IOI) to which 45 programs and organizations willingly gave hours of their time and scads of information about their technical development and design, their fiscal models, their revenue streams and expenditures, their documentation, and their governance and community engagement work.

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Source: Why Are So Many Scholarly Communication Infrastructure Providers Running a Red Queen’s Race? | Educopia Institute

2019 ACRL Environmental Scan Released – ACRL Insider

From Mary Jane Petrowski in ACRL Insider:

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Every two years, the ACRL Research Planning and Review Committee releases an environmental scan of higher education, including developments with the potential for continuing impact on academic libraries. The 2019 Environmental Scan (PDF) provides a broad review of the current higher education landscape, with special focus on the state of academic and research libraries.

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Source: 2019 ACRL Environmental Scan Released – ACRL Insider

Investing in Open Scholarly Infrastructure: a Community Opportunity – SPARC

From SPARC:

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As an organization committed to making “open” the default in research and education, we at SPARC recognize that scholarship is at its best when communities of researchers and scholars are fully empowered to share, discover, and collaborate. Currently, however, the reality is that the needs of the community are not being well-served by the existing scholarly communication infrastructure, which is dominated by vendors whose missions and values often run counter to those of the community. When the business models of these vendors favor lock-in, consolidation, and monopoly, the result is a market where opportunity for healthy competition is limited, and opportunities for sharing are limited.

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Source: Investing in Open Scholarly Infrastructure: a Community Opportunity – SPARC

More Scholarly Communications Consolidation as Institutional Repository Provider DuraSpace Merges into Lyrasis – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Roger C. Schonfeld via the Scholarly Kitchen:

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Source: More Scholarly Communications Consolidation as Institutional Repository Provider DuraSpace Merges into Lyrasis – The Scholarly Kitchen

Community Code: Supporting the Mission of Open Access and Preservation with the Use of Open Source Library Technologies | Florida State University Libraries

From Keila Zayas-Ruiz and Mark Baggett via Florida State University Libraries:

“As librarians, we serve as champions for equal access and preservation of materials, both scholarly and cultural in significance. One of the core missions of libraries is access. Due to increased demand for scholarly articles and the technological advances of the internet, open access is quickly becoming a major priority among research libraries today. It “has expanded the possibilities for disseminating one’s own research and accessing that of others.” The movement of open access aligns closely with the ALA core value of access as outlined by the ALA council: “All information resources that are provided directly or indirectly by the library, regardless of technology, format, or methods of delivery, should be readily, equally, and equitably accessible to all library users.” It has gained considerable momentum in recent years among librarians in institutions of higher education, spurring funds dedicated to support authors who wish to publish in open access journals, the creation of library-run online open access journals, and open access mandates for faculty members.”

Source: Community Code: Supporting the Mission of Open Access and Preservation with the Use of Open Source Library Technologies | Florida State University Libraries

 

 

The First Step Towards a System of Open Digital Scholarly Communication Infrastructure – IO: In The Open

From David W. Lewis, Mike Roy, and Katherine Skinner via In the Open

“We are working on a project to map the infrastructure required to support digital scholarly communications.  This project is an outgrowth of David W. Lewis’ “2.5% Commitment” proposal.

Even in the early stages of this effort we have had to confront several uncomfortable truths.”

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Source: The First Step Towards a System of Open Digital Scholarly Communication Infrastructure – IO: In The Open