Category: Subscriptions

A Guest Post from CCC – Top 5 Resources on Transformative Agreements – OASPA

From Chuck Hemenway in Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association Blog:

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Transformative Agreements are a popular topic of conversation these days – but do you ever feel like you need a quick refresher course on the topic? Read, watch, or listen to the items below for a deeper practical understanding of Transformative Agreements, fast.

1. “TRANSFORMATIVE AGREEMENTS: What are transformative agreements?” from ESAC Initiative

Transformative Agreements are those contracts negotiated between institutions (libraries, national and regional consortia) and publishers that transform the business model underlying scholarly journal publishing, moving from one based on toll access (subscription) to one in which publishers are remunerated a fair price for their open access publishing services.
Bonus: Browse ESAC’s Agreement Registry for summaries of dozens of recent Transformative Agreements.

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Source: A Guest Post from CCC – Top 5 Resources on Transformative Agreements – OASPA

Pursuing a new kind of “big deal” with publishers | Inside Higher Ed

From Lindsay McKenzie in Inside Higher Ed:

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Making the transition from paying to read to paying to publish academic research won’t be easy for universities or publishers. But it is possible, attendees at an open-access-publishing event were told Thursday.

The University of California, which canceled its “big deal” with publisher Elsevier earlier this year after negotiations to establish a new agreement broke down, hosted a public forum discussing how libraries, publishers and funders can support a system where all research articles are made free to read at the time of publication — a standard known as gold open access.

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Source: Pursuing a new kind of “big deal” with publishers

Big Deal Knowledge Base – SPARC

From SPARC:

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This database puts libraries on a more level playing field with vendors by detailing what thousands of peer institutions have paid for journal subscription packages. Institutions can leverage this pricing data, as well as the other resources on this site, to make clearer assessments about the suitability of these Big Deals and to strengthen their negotiating power.

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Source: Big Deal Knowledge Base – SPARC

In act of brinkmanship, a big publisher cuts off UC’s access to its academic journals – Los Angeles Times

From Michael Hiltzik in the LA Times:

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The bitter battle between the University of California, a leading source of published research papers, and Elsevier, the world’s largest publisher of research papers, just got more bitter.

As of Wednesday, Elsevier cut off access by UC faculty, staff and students to articles published since Jan. 1 in 2,500 Elsevier journals, including respected medical publications such as Cell and the Lancet and a host of engineering and scientific journals. Access to most material published in 2018 and earlier remains in force.

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Source: In act of brinkmanship, a big publisher cuts off UC’s access to its academic journals – Los Angeles Times

2019 ACRL Environmental Scan Released – ACRL Insider

From Mary Jane Petrowski in ACRL Insider:

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Every two years, the ACRL Research Planning and Review Committee releases an environmental scan of higher education, including developments with the potential for continuing impact on academic libraries. The 2019 Environmental Scan (PDF) provides a broad review of the current higher education landscape, with special focus on the state of academic and research libraries.

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Source: 2019 ACRL Environmental Scan Released – ACRL Insider

LSU ends Elsevier bundled journal subscription | Inside Higher Ed

From Lindsay McKenzie in Inside Higher Ed:

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LSU is just the latest of several U.S. institutions, including the University of California system, Temple University and Florida State University, to announce its intentions to end its business relationship with Elsevier in the last two years.

“For decades, LSU has subscribed to a package of some 1,800 electronic journal titles from Elsevier,” Stacia Haynie, LSU’s provost, said in a statement Monday. But “dramatic increases” in subscription costs have made the deal unsustainable, she said./blockquote>
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Source: LSU ends Elsevier bundled journal subscription

Are Mirror Journals Just Hybrid Open Access Journals In Disguise Or Are They A Viable Route To The Open Access Future? | A Way of Happening

From Ryan Regier in A Way of Happening: A Research Library Blog:

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“Developments in the open access world seem to be moving at a lightning pace lately. Plan S has added a realism and urgency to OA discussions. Never to be behind on any ‘scholcomm’ development, Elsevier has started a pilot program of launching what they are calling ‘Mirror Journals’.  Open Access (OA) ‘copies’ of existing peer reviewed journals. Journals that are “fully gold open access but share the same editorial board, aims and scope and peer review policies as their existing “parent” journals – and the same level of visibility and discoverability.”

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Source: Are Mirror Journals Just Hybrid Open Access Journals In Disguise Or Are They A Viable Route To The Open Access Future? | A Way of Happening

Researcher to Reader (R2R) Debate: Is Sci-Hub Good or Bad for Scholarly Communication? – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Rick Anderson in The Scholarly Kitchen:

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“One plenary session of the 2019 Researcher to Reader (R2R) Conference was a debate on the proposition “Resolved: Sci-Hub is doing more good than harm to scholarly communication.” Arguing in favor of the resolution was Daniel Himmelstein, a postdoctoral fellow in genomics at the University of Pennsylvania. Arguing against it was Justin Spence, partner and co-founder of PSI Ltd., and the IP Registry.”

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Source: Researcher to Reader (R2R) Debate: Is Sci-Hub Good or Bad for Scholarly Communication? – The Scholarly Kitchen

Open statement: Why UC cut ties with Elsevier | UC Berkeley Library News

From the UC-Elsevier Negotiating Team in UC Berkeley Library News:

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The University of California has taken a firm stand on both open access to publicly funded research and fiscal responsibility by deciding not to renew its subscriptions with Elsevier, the world’s largest scientific publisher. Here’s why:

Under Elsevier’s proposed terms, the publisher would capture significant new revenue on top of the university’s current multimillion-dollar subscription while significantly diminishing UC’s rights to Elsevier content. Elsevier’s latest proposal did consider some of UC’s conditions, including providing UC authors with open access publishing options across much of the publisher’s portfolio of journals. However, it had serious flaws.

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Source: Open statement: Why UC cut ties with Elsevier | UC Berkeley Library News

University of California cancels deal with Elsevier after months of negotiations | Inside Higher Ed

From Lindsay McKenzie in Inside Higher Ed:

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The University of California System has canceled its multimillion-dollar subscription contract with Elsevier, an academic publisher.

Other institutions have canceled their “big deal” journal subscription contracts with major publishers before. But none in the U.S. have the financial and scholarly clout of the UC system — which accounts for nearly 10 percent of the nation’s publishing output.

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Source: University of California cancels deal with Elsevier after months of negotiations