Tag: Business Models

Guest Post: Evaluating Open Access in a Consortial Context – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Gwen Evans in The Scholarly Kitchen:

Preview:

As several recent announcements and initiatives have shown, Open Access (OA) negotiations between libraries and publishers are complex, in a constant state of flux, and provide little predictability — and OA models and negotiations within library consortia contain complexities all their own. One of the key questions library consortia have to ask themselves is, Are you a Publish or a Read library consortium, or somewhere in between? As Lisa Hinchliffe’s recent primer on transformative agreements notes, the implications of Publish and Read versus Read and Publish are different for different consortia.

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Source: Guest Post: Evaluating Open Access in a Consortial Context – The Scholarly Kitchen

Researcher to Reader (R2R) Debate: Is Sci-Hub Good or Bad for Scholarly Communication? – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Rick Anderson in The Scholarly Kitchen:

Preview:

“One plenary session of the 2019 Researcher to Reader (R2R) Conference was a debate on the proposition “Resolved: Sci-Hub is doing more good than harm to scholarly communication.” Arguing in favor of the resolution was Daniel Himmelstein, a postdoctoral fellow in genomics at the University of Pennsylvania. Arguing against it was Justin Spence, partner and co-founder of PSI Ltd., and the IP Registry.”

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Source: Researcher to Reader (R2R) Debate: Is Sci-Hub Good or Bad for Scholarly Communication? – The Scholarly Kitchen

Guest Post – Low Cost Textbook Alternatives: Worth the Effort? – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Liz Gabbitas in The Scholarly Kitchen:

Preview:

College textbooks are expensive. In most industries, a more expensive product is also a higher quality one. However, in college textbook publishing this may not be true. In the following case study, an instructor at the University of Utah on the hunt for better materials for an entry-level Arabic language course came to the library looking to create a solution. This article explores the resulting workbook, the collaborative process, and the future of course materials like this one.

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Source: Guest Post – Low Cost Textbook Alternatives: Worth the Effort? – The Scholarly Kitchen

Taking Stock of the Feedback on Plan S Implementation Guidance – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe in The Scholarly Kitchen:

Preview:

Like many others, I found myself reading response after response after response to cOAlition S’ call for feedback on the Guidance on the Implementation of Plan S last week. The volume of response is staggering. Statements have poured in from individual and groups — publishers, scholarly societies, disciplinary repositories, scholarly communications platforms, funding agencies, publishing professionals, libraries, library associations, and researchers themselves. As the deadline drew near on Friday, I could hardly “right click/open link in new tab” fast enough as my Twitter feed scrolled by. The input from Norway alone has reached 885 pages. The Open Access Tracking Project currently has almost 400 documents tagged oa.plan_s. reddit Open Science and Scholia/wikidata have also been tracking replies. One imagines that there is feedback that has not been shared publicly as well.

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Source: Taking Stock of the Feedback on Plan S Implementation Guidance – The Scholarly Kitchen

Elsevier Chairman YS Chi: An Interview – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Roger Schonfeld via the Scholarly Kitchen

“Last week, approximately 180 leaders from scholarly societies, libraries, publishers, and other organizations came together at ITHAKA’s Next Wave conference in New York City. The day’s sessions featured an array of different formats and experts, focusing mostly on fundamental changes facing higher education in the United States, the result of underlying demographics, financial pressures, narrowing political support, and tension around how to define student success. The program also included a number of sessions focused on scholarly publishing and academic libraries. The opening session was an interview, conducted by ITHAKA president Kevin Guthrie of Elsevier’s chairman Youngsuk (“YS”) Chi, with some additional questions from the audience. The interview generated discussion and perspective not only about Elsevier itself, but also about broader changes in scholarly communication and approaches to organizational leadership. I have attempted to reconstruct the interview here from my notes, and Chi and Guthrie have each had a chance to edit and expand their remarks here for the record.”

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Source: Elsevier Chairman YS Chi: An Interview – The Scholarly Kitchen

Plan S: A Mandate for Gold OA with Lots of Strings Attached – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Angela Cochran via the Scholarly Kitchen:

“Over the past several weeks, many in the scholarly publishing world have been reacting to the open access (OA) 10 principles outlined by cOAlition S — a plan now referred to as “Plan S”. The principles laid out were interesting but lacked significant detail leading to loads of conversations trying to imagine what an implementation might look like.

Last week the “implementation plan” for Plan S compliance was posted. The biggest questions going in were whether they would really disallow hybrid models and what the proposed the APC cap would look like.”

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Source: Plan S: A Mandate for Gold OA with Lots of Strings Attached – The Scholarly Kitchen

Learning Lessons from DPLA – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Roger Schonfeld via The Scholarly Kitchen:

“DPLA — the Digital Public Library of America — last week laid off six members of its small staff. Over the weekend, DPLA executive director John Bracken, in a talk at the LITA Forum, provided an overview of DPLA’s vision, which appears to include a change in strategic direction. DPLA is a not-for-profit organization with a strong board including library leaders Brian Bannon of Chicago Public, Chris Bourg of MIT, and Denise Stephens of Washington University St. Louis, Oxford University Press’s Niko Pfund, and Wikimedia CEO Katherine Maher, among others. DPLA launched five years ago, with a strategy focused on aggregating and curating special collections and a technical approach that made sense for the web that was celebrated here in the Kitchen. It now appears to be pivoting more towards ebook distribution systems. It is also clearly facing some difficulties right now. “

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Source: Learning Lessons from DPLA – The Scholarly Kitchen

Affordable Learning Requires a Diverse Approach, Part 1: Playing the Short Game (and the Long One) to Secure Savings for Students – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Gwen Evans via the Scholarly Kitchen: 

OhioLINK, the state agency for Ohio’s higher education libraries, recently negotiated statewide pricing agreements for inclusive access textbooks with six major publishers: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., McGraw-Hill Education, Pearson, Macmillan Learning, Cengage and Sage. It covers all 91 member institutions in OhioLINK – public and private. According to the publishers, this is a groundbreaking initiative in its scale and comprehensiveness across virtually all non-profit higher education institutions in a single state.”

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Source: Affordable Learning Requires a Diverse Approach, Part 1: Playing the Short Game (and the Long One) to Secure Savings for Students – The Scholarly Kitchen

Will the European Big Deal Contagion Spread to North America? – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Roger C. Schonfeld via The Scholarly Kitchen:

“Today, in looking at the scholarly publishing sector, equity markets are focused on the European national-level consortial negotiations. If analysts are not surprised at the strong rhetoric about cancelling Big Deal packages that has emerged from the university sectors, they are troubled to see entire nations actually canceling their licenses. They have watched publishing revenue from a major country like Germany disappear all at once from one major publisher’s income statement. And they want to know whether this “contagion” will spread to North America. My view is that, while the germs are circulating, at least in the near term, publishers are unlikely to face a global pandemic.”

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Source: Will the European Big Deal Contagion Spread to North America? – The Scholarly Kitchen

Focusing on Value – 102 Things Journal Publishers Do (2018 Update) – The Scholarly Kitchen

From the Scholarly Kitchen:

“The first version of this list was created back in the summer of 2012, at a time when publishers were being challenged repeatedly to prove they added value beyond managing peer review and some basic copy editing and formatting….This update is a reframing and expansion of the list. I’ve changed the motif from the cost perspective (expense, level of difficulty, and duration) to the value perspective (uniqueness, value, importance). The list has always been implicitly a list of things journal publishers do, so this year I’ve made that explicit in the headline. “

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Source: Focusing on Value – 102 Things Journal Publishers Do (2018 Update) – The Scholarly Kitchen