Tag: Libraries

More Scholarly Communications Consolidation as Institutional Repository Provider DuraSpace Merges into Lyrasis – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Roger C. Schonfeld via the Scholarly Kitchen:

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Source: More Scholarly Communications Consolidation as Institutional Repository Provider DuraSpace Merges into Lyrasis – The Scholarly Kitchen

Elsevier Chairman YS Chi: An Interview – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Roger Schonfeld via the Scholarly Kitchen

“Last week, approximately 180 leaders from scholarly societies, libraries, publishers, and other organizations came together at ITHAKA’s Next Wave conference in New York City. The day’s sessions featured an array of different formats and experts, focusing mostly on fundamental changes facing higher education in the United States, the result of underlying demographics, financial pressures, narrowing political support, and tension around how to define student success. The program also included a number of sessions focused on scholarly publishing and academic libraries. The opening session was an interview, conducted by ITHAKA president Kevin Guthrie of Elsevier’s chairman Youngsuk (“YS”) Chi, with some additional questions from the audience. The interview generated discussion and perspective not only about Elsevier itself, but also about broader changes in scholarly communication and approaches to organizational leadership. I have attempted to reconstruct the interview here from my notes, and Chi and Guthrie have each had a chance to edit and expand their remarks here for the record.”

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Source: Elsevier Chairman YS Chi: An Interview – The Scholarly Kitchen

Learning Lessons from DPLA – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Roger Schonfeld via The Scholarly Kitchen:

“DPLA — the Digital Public Library of America — last week laid off six members of its small staff. Over the weekend, DPLA executive director John Bracken, in a talk at the LITA Forum, provided an overview of DPLA’s vision, which appears to include a change in strategic direction. DPLA is a not-for-profit organization with a strong board including library leaders Brian Bannon of Chicago Public, Chris Bourg of MIT, and Denise Stephens of Washington University St. Louis, Oxford University Press’s Niko Pfund, and Wikimedia CEO Katherine Maher, among others. DPLA launched five years ago, with a strategy focused on aggregating and curating special collections and a technical approach that made sense for the web that was celebrated here in the Kitchen. It now appears to be pivoting more towards ebook distribution systems. It is also clearly facing some difficulties right now. “

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Source: Learning Lessons from DPLA – The Scholarly Kitchen

Affordable Learning Requires a Diverse Approach, Part 1: Playing the Short Game (and the Long One) to Secure Savings for Students – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Gwen Evans via the Scholarly Kitchen: 

OhioLINK, the state agency for Ohio’s higher education libraries, recently negotiated statewide pricing agreements for inclusive access textbooks with six major publishers: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., McGraw-Hill Education, Pearson, Macmillan Learning, Cengage and Sage. It covers all 91 member institutions in OhioLINK – public and private. According to the publishers, this is a groundbreaking initiative in its scale and comprehensiveness across virtually all non-profit higher education institutions in a single state.”

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Source: Affordable Learning Requires a Diverse Approach, Part 1: Playing the Short Game (and the Long One) to Secure Savings for Students – The Scholarly Kitchen

Will the European Big Deal Contagion Spread to North America? – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Roger C. Schonfeld via The Scholarly Kitchen:

“Today, in looking at the scholarly publishing sector, equity markets are focused on the European national-level consortial negotiations. If analysts are not surprised at the strong rhetoric about cancelling Big Deal packages that has emerged from the university sectors, they are troubled to see entire nations actually canceling their licenses. They have watched publishing revenue from a major country like Germany disappear all at once from one major publisher’s income statement. And they want to know whether this “contagion” will spread to North America. My view is that, while the germs are circulating, at least in the near term, publishers are unlikely to face a global pandemic.”

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Source: Will the European Big Deal Contagion Spread to North America? – The Scholarly Kitchen

Libraries Face a Future of Open Access – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Joseph Esposito via the Scholarly Kitchen:

“When librarians prepare for a negotiation, they now routinely reach for the muscle.

At least that’s how I read the news about the Swedish library consortium and its dealings with Elsevier. If you have been too preoccupied with the Royal Wedding to pay attention to news coming out of the world of STM publishing, you can get a good backgrounder here. Briefly, the Swedish consortium attempted to dictate terms to Elsevier, terms that Elsevier would not accept. The result is that Elsevier’s contract will be cancelled, meaning that there will be no authorized access to Elsevier content for the consortium users.”

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Source: Libraries Face a Future of Open Access – The Scholarly Kitchen

Focusing on Value – 102 Things Journal Publishers Do (2018 Update) – The Scholarly Kitchen

From the Scholarly Kitchen:

“The first version of this list was created back in the summer of 2012, at a time when publishers were being challenged repeatedly to prove they added value beyond managing peer review and some basic copy editing and formatting….This update is a reframing and expansion of the list. I’ve changed the motif from the cost perspective (expense, level of difficulty, and duration) to the value perspective (uniqueness, value, importance). The list has always been implicitly a list of things journal publishers do, so this year I’ve made that explicit in the headline. “

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Source: Focusing on Value – 102 Things Journal Publishers Do (2018 Update) – The Scholarly Kitchen

Revisiting Section 108 – Scholarly Communications @ Duke

From Scholarly Communications @ Duke:

…the U.S. Copyright Office released its long-awaited review of improvements to Section 108 of the Copyright Act, the section which grants limited, specific exceptions to copyright for libraries and archives. Over a decade ago the Office convened the Section 108 Study Group* to assess improvements to this section, and in 2008 that group produced its report. Since then (and with recent inquiries from the Office to stakeholders) we’ve been waiting to hear from the Copyright Office about its views on updates to Section 108. This Section 108 “Discussion Document” does just that.

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Source: Revisiting Section 108