Tag: open access

More Scholarly Communications Consolidation as Institutional Repository Provider DuraSpace Merges into Lyrasis – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Roger C. Schonfeld via the Scholarly Kitchen:

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Source: More Scholarly Communications Consolidation as Institutional Repository Provider DuraSpace Merges into Lyrasis – The Scholarly Kitchen

Open Access 2018: A Year of Funders and Universities Drawing Lines in the Sand | Absolutely Maybe

From Hilda Bastian via Absolutely Maybe:

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“This is the sixth year I’ve rounded up the year in open access – and it was the most remarkable. When the year began, the world’s largest academic publisher, Elsevier, had increased their annual profits, with an operating profit approaching US$1.2 billion in science, technology, and medicine – a profit margin of over 36%. [PDF] By year’s end, a hefty chunk of the world’s research community was walking away from big subscription deals with Elsevier and others.”

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Source: Open Access 2018: A Year of Funders and Universities Drawing Lines in the Sand | Absolutely Maybe

Elsevier Chairman YS Chi: An Interview – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Roger Schonfeld via the Scholarly Kitchen

“Last week, approximately 180 leaders from scholarly societies, libraries, publishers, and other organizations came together at ITHAKA’s Next Wave conference in New York City. The day’s sessions featured an array of different formats and experts, focusing mostly on fundamental changes facing higher education in the United States, the result of underlying demographics, financial pressures, narrowing political support, and tension around how to define student success. The program also included a number of sessions focused on scholarly publishing and academic libraries. The opening session was an interview, conducted by ITHAKA president Kevin Guthrie of Elsevier’s chairman Youngsuk (“YS”) Chi, with some additional questions from the audience. The interview generated discussion and perspective not only about Elsevier itself, but also about broader changes in scholarly communication and approaches to organizational leadership. I have attempted to reconstruct the interview here from my notes, and Chi and Guthrie have each had a chance to edit and expand their remarks here for the record.”

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Source: Elsevier Chairman YS Chi: An Interview – The Scholarly Kitchen

Plan S: A Mandate for Gold OA with Lots of Strings Attached – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Angela Cochran via the Scholarly Kitchen:

“Over the past several weeks, many in the scholarly publishing world have been reacting to the open access (OA) 10 principles outlined by cOAlition S — a plan now referred to as “Plan S”. The principles laid out were interesting but lacked significant detail leading to loads of conversations trying to imagine what an implementation might look like.

Last week the “implementation plan” for Plan S compliance was posted. The biggest questions going in were whether they would really disallow hybrid models and what the proposed the APC cap would look like.”

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Source: Plan S: A Mandate for Gold OA with Lots of Strings Attached – The Scholarly Kitchen

OASPA members demonstrate another year of steady growth in CC BY article numbers for fully-OA journals – OASPA

From Claire Redhead via OASPA:

“A total of 1,128,721 articles were published with the CC BY license in open access-only (fully-OA) journals by members of OASPA during the period 2000-2017, with 219,627 of those being published in 2017 alone.”

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Source: OASPA members demonstrate another year of steady growth in CC BY article numbers for fully-OA journals – OASPA

Recording and Slides Available from the Hot Topics Series: The 2.5% Commitment: Investing in Open – Duraspace.org

From Carol Minton Morris at Duraspace:

“Members of Duraspace are among leaders of institutions from all over the world who share a belief that our digital scientific and cultural heritage should be preserved and made accessible for future generations. Members of DuraSpace have been invited to become part of a conversation that aims to begin an investigation into what it will take to sustain the emerging set of open technologies that underpin the open scholarly ecosystem we all depend on.The recording and slides from “The Future Will Be Open?” series kick-off webinar on May 17: “The 2.5% Commitment: Investing in Open” are now available. This webinar focused on David Lewis’ proposal for a 2.5% investment in open infrastructure and how it aims to make visible the investments academic libraries make in open infrastructure and content.”

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Source: Recording and Slides Available from the Hot Topics Series: The 2.5% Commitment: Investing in Open – Duraspace.org

Libraries Face a Future of Open Access – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Joseph Esposito via the Scholarly Kitchen:

“When librarians prepare for a negotiation, they now routinely reach for the muscle.

At least that’s how I read the news about the Swedish library consortium and its dealings with Elsevier. If you have been too preoccupied with the Royal Wedding to pay attention to news coming out of the world of STM publishing, you can get a good backgrounder here. Briefly, the Swedish consortium attempted to dictate terms to Elsevier, terms that Elsevier would not accept. The result is that Elsevier’s contract will be cancelled, meaning that there will be no authorized access to Elsevier content for the consortium users.”

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Source: Libraries Face a Future of Open Access – The Scholarly Kitchen

It’s Gonna Get a Lot Easier To Break Science Journal Paywalls | WIRED

From Adam Rogers at WIRED, an interesting piece about Google Scholar and paywalls:

“Anurag Acharya’s problem was that the Google search bar is very smart, but also kind of dumb. As a Googler working on search 13 years ago, Acharya wanted to make search results encompass scholarly journal articles. A laudable goal, because unlike the open web, most of the raw output of scientific research was invisible—hidden behind paywalls. People might not even know it existed.”

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Source: It’s Gonna Get a Lot Easier To Break Science Journal Paywalls | WIRED

Focusing on Value – 102 Things Journal Publishers Do (2018 Update) – The Scholarly Kitchen

From the Scholarly Kitchen:

“The first version of this list was created back in the summer of 2012, at a time when publishers were being challenged repeatedly to prove they added value beyond managing peer review and some basic copy editing and formatting….This update is a reframing and expansion of the list. I’ve changed the motif from the cost perspective (expense, level of difficulty, and duration) to the value perspective (uniqueness, value, importance). The list has always been implicitly a list of things journal publishers do, so this year I’ve made that explicit in the headline. “

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Source: Focusing on Value – 102 Things Journal Publishers Do (2018 Update) – The Scholarly Kitchen

A Look Back at Open Access Week 2017 | ACRL TechConnect

From Margaret Heller via ACRL TechConnect Blog:

This year’s Open Access Week at my institution was a bit different than before. With our time constrained by conference travel and staff shortages leaving everyone over-scheduled, we decided to aim for a week of “virtual programming”, with a week of blog posts and an invitation to view our open access research guide. While this lacked the splashiness of programming in prior years, in another way it felt important to do this work in this way. Yes, it may well be that only people already well-connected to the library saw any of this material. But promotion of open access requires a great deal of self-education among librarians or other library insiders before we can promote it more broadly. For many libraries, it may be the case that there are only a few “open access” people, and Open Access Week ends up being the only time during the year the topic is addressed by the library as a whole.

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Source: A Look Back at Open Access Week 2017