Tag: via bookmarklet

Added by PressForward

Learning Lessons from DPLA – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Roger Schonfeld via The Scholarly Kitchen:

“DPLA — the Digital Public Library of America — last week laid off six members of its small staff. Over the weekend, DPLA executive director John Bracken, in a talk at the LITA Forum, provided an overview of DPLA’s vision, which appears to include a change in strategic direction. DPLA is a not-for-profit organization with a strong board including library leaders Brian Bannon of Chicago Public, Chris Bourg of MIT, and Denise Stephens of Washington University St. Louis, Oxford University Press’s Niko Pfund, and Wikimedia CEO Katherine Maher, among others. DPLA launched five years ago, with a strategy focused on aggregating and curating special collections and a technical approach that made sense for the web that was celebrated here in the Kitchen. It now appears to be pivoting more towards ebook distribution systems. It is also clearly facing some difficulties right now. “

Read more here:
Source: Learning Lessons from DPLA – The Scholarly Kitchen

The Rebus Guide to Publishing Open Textbooks (So Far) – Simple Book Publishing

From Apurva Ashok and Zoe Wake Hyde:

“The Rebus Guide to Publishing Open Textbooks (So Far) is a living repository of collective knowledge, written to equip all those who want to publish open textbooks with the resources they need. Representing two years of collaboration, innumerable conversations and exchanges, and a wide range of collective knowledge and experience, the Guide is a book-in-progress and will evolve and grow over time. Join the project discussion and help shape its development!”

Read more here:
Source: The Rebus Guide to Publishing Open Textbooks (So Far) – Simple Book Publishing

An A-Z list of scholarly publishing and open science platforms – BMJ Digital

From BMJ Digital:

Inspired by Ian Mulvany’s tweet about Vega Academic Publishing System (which does look interesting, especially the partnership with Oslo School of Architecture and Design). We thought we would publish the list of publishing platforms that we keep an eye on.  The list is a bit of a jumble and includes a number of platforms like Aletheia, PubPub and Authorea aimed at authors who want to self-publish. A number of open science initiatives like Pluto Network, Lab Scribbles and the open archive HAL. Publishers like Elsevier and SpringerNature who run their own platforms but don’t open them up to other publishers aren’t listed. 

Read more here:

Source: An A-Z list of scholarly publishing and open science platforms (Updated 6 November 2018) – BMJ Digital

DOAJ How-To Guide | LPC DOAJ Task Force

From the Library Publishing Coalition DOAJ Task Force (2017-18):

“In partnership with the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), LPC has created a how-to guide that walks applicants through the DOAJ application process step-by-step. The guide includes explanations of commonly misunderstood questions and information specific to library publishing. Having a journal indexed in DOAJ is a marker of quality for publishers, but the application process is sometimes daunting. We hope this new resource will help more library publishers to successfully apply for inclusion in the index!”

Read more here:

Source: DOAJ how-to guide, LPC DOAJ task force – Google Docs

Format Shift: Information Behavior and User Experience in the Academic E-book Environment | Tracy | Reference & User Services Quarterly

From Daniel G. Tracy via Reference & User Services Quarterly:

Abstract:

“This article seeks to understand information behavior in the context of the academic e-book user experience, shaped by a disparate set of vendor platforms licensed by libraries. These platforms vary in design and affordances, yet studies of e-book use in an academic context often treat e-books as a unified phenomenon in opposition to print books. Based on participant diaries tracking e-book information behavior and follow-up interviews and focus groups on troubleshooting and format shifting behaviors, this study seeks to provide a deep qualitative look at decisions that academic users make about formats when encountering e-books. It identifies reasons for noted disparities between stated user preferences for print books while often using e-books instead. It also demonstrates the importance of considering e-books as a set of formats, rather than a unified experience, when evaluating e-book platforms or providing information services around a set of platforms. While e-book studies often point to a distinction between “use” of e-books and “reading” of print books by users, this study shows much more willingness to both use and read e-books for some tasks if platforms allow for offloading reading of content to preferred reading devices and apps. This has implications for collection development, advocacy with vendors, and for marketing to or consulting with users about e-book access and use options.”

Read more here:

Source: Format Shift: Information Behavior and User Experience in the Academic E-book Environment | Tracy | Reference & User Services Quarterly

The State of Digital Preservation in 2018 | Ithaka S+R

From Oya Y. Rieger via Ithaka S+R:

“Our cultural, historic, and scientific heritage is increasingly being produced and shared in digital forms. The ubiquity, pervasiveness, variability, and fluidity of such content raise a range of questions about the role of research libraries and archives in digital preservation in the face of rapid organizational and technological changes and evolving organizational priorities. Ithaka S+R is interested in exploring the current landscape of digital preservation programs and services in order to identify research and policy questions that will contribute to the advancement of strategies in support of future scholarship. To this end, during June and July 2018, I talked with 21 experts and thought leaders to hear their perspectives on the state of digital preservation. The purpose of this report is to share a number of common themes that permeated through the conversations and provide an opportunity for broader community reaction and engagement, which will over time contribute to the development of an Ithaka S+R research agenda in these areas.”

Source: The State of Digital Preservation in 2018 | Ithaka S+R

Georgia State and publishers continue legal battle over fair use of course materials | Inside Higher Ed

From Lindsay McKenzie via Inside Higher Ed:

“When three publishers sued Georgia State University for sharing excerpts of textbooks with students at no charge 10 years ago, librarians and faculty members took notice. The lawsuit was a big deal for universities offering “e-reserves” to students — free downloadable course materials that often included scanned pages from print textbooks.”

Read more here:
Source: Georgia State and publishers continue legal battle over fair use of course materials

Affordable Learning Requires a Diverse Approach, Part 1: Playing the Short Game (and the Long One) to Secure Savings for Students – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Gwen Evans via the Scholarly Kitchen: 

OhioLINK, the state agency for Ohio’s higher education libraries, recently negotiated statewide pricing agreements for inclusive access textbooks with six major publishers: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., McGraw-Hill Education, Pearson, Macmillan Learning, Cengage and Sage. It covers all 91 member institutions in OhioLINK – public and private. According to the publishers, this is a groundbreaking initiative in its scale and comprehensiveness across virtually all non-profit higher education institutions in a single state.”

Read more here:

Source: Affordable Learning Requires a Diverse Approach, Part 1: Playing the Short Game (and the Long One) to Secure Savings for Students – The Scholarly Kitchen

Survey of faculty views of technology explores online teaching, OER, assessment | Inside Higher Ed

From Doug Lederman via Inside Higher Ed:

“The proportion of college instructors who are teaching online and blended courses is growing. So is their support for using technology to deliver instruction.  But their belief in the quality and effectiveness of online courses and digital technology isn’t keeping pace.  Those are among the findings — conflicting and confounding, as is often the case — of Inside Higher Ed’s 2018 Survey of Faculty Attitudes on Technology, published today in partnership with Gallup.”

Read more here:

Source: Survey of faculty views of technology explores online teaching, OER, assessment

Announcing the Authors Alliance Guide to Understanding and Negotiating Book Publication Contracts! | Authors Alliance

From the Authors Alliance:

“We are delighted to share our brand-new guide to Understanding and Negotiating Book Publication Contracts.

Now available to the public (following a special pre-release to our Kickstarter backers), this new guide is the latest addition to our growing library of resources for authors, which also includes educational handbooks on rights reversion, open access, and fair use.

Copyright law and contract language are complex, even for attorneys and experts. Authors may be tempted to sign the first version of a publication contract that they receive, especially if negotiating seems complicated, intimidating, or risky. But there is a lot at stake for authors in a book deal, and it is well worth the effort to read the contract, understand its contents, and negotiate for favorable terms.”

Read more here:

Source: Announcing the Authors Alliance Guide to Understanding and Negotiating Book Publication Contracts! | Authors Alliance