Tag: via bookmarklet

Added by PressForward

Taking Stock of the Feedback on Plan S Implementation Guidance – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe in The Scholarly Kitchen:

Preview:

Like many others, I found myself reading response after response after response to cOAlition S’ call for feedback on the Guidance on the Implementation of Plan S last week. The volume of response is staggering. Statements have poured in from individual and groups — publishers, scholarly societies, disciplinary repositories, scholarly communications platforms, funding agencies, publishing professionals, libraries, library associations, and researchers themselves. As the deadline drew near on Friday, I could hardly “right click/open link in new tab” fast enough as my Twitter feed scrolled by. The input from Norway alone has reached 885 pages. The Open Access Tracking Project currently has almost 400 documents tagged oa.plan_s. reddit Open Science and Scholia/wikidata have also been tracking replies. One imagines that there is feedback that has not been shared publicly as well.

Continue reading here:

Source: Taking Stock of the Feedback on Plan S Implementation Guidance – The Scholarly Kitchen

Open Access Is Going Mainstream. Here’s Why That Could Transform Academic Life. – The Chronicle of Higher Education

From Lindsay Ellis in the Chronicle for Higher Education:

Debate over the future of scholarly publishing felt remote to Kathryn M. Jones, an associate professor of biology at Florida State University — that is, until she attended a Faculty Senate meeting last year.

There she learned that the library might renegotiate its $2-million subscription with the publishing behemoth Elsevier, which would limit her and her colleagues’ access to groundbreaking research. Horror sank in. Like other experimental scientists, Jones regularly skims articles published in subscription journals to plan future experiments. What would happen if she couldn’t access that body of important work with the click of a button?

Continue reading here:
Source: Open Access Is Going Mainstream. Here’s Why That Could Transform Academic Life. – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Academy-owned? Academic-led? Community-led? What’s at stake in the words we use to describe new publishing paradigms | Library Publishing Coalition

From Melanie Schlosser and Catherine Mitchell in the LPC Blog:

Preview:

“Academy-owned” seems to be the descriptor du jour in scholarly communications circles.  We talk increasingly about academy-owned infrastructure, academy-owned publishing, academy-owned publications, etc. We find ourselves at meetings and conferences where we explore the challenges of supporting new forms of scholarly research, new modes of publication, new communities of readers — and there it is again — “academy-owned,” lurking in the conversation. We write grants whose very premise is that the academy will rise to claim its rightful place as the source, the maker, the distributor, the curator of its greatest asset — knowledge. There is definitely a movement afoot.

Continue reading here:

Source: Academy-owned? Academic-led? Community-led? What’s at stake in the words we use to describe new publishing paradigms | Library Publishing Coalition

Publishers express concern about unintended consequences of Plan S | Inside Higher Ed

From Lindsay McKenzie in Inside Higher Ed:

Preview:

The goal of Plan S is simple — make all publicly funded research immediately available to the public. It’s a goal many universities, research funders and academics say they support. The problem is agreeing on how to get there, and who should pay for it.

flurry of documents published by publishers, research funders, scholarly societies and academics earlier this month in response to a call for feedback on Plan S highlight just how little agreement there is about how to implement the European open-access initiative, which could impact scholarly publishing practices worldwide.

Continue reading here:

Source: Publishers express concern about unintended consequences of Plan S

You are invited: PALSave’s Open Textbook Network Workshop, 3/18/19 – PALSave: PALNI Affordable Learning

PALNI campuses are affiliate members of the Open Textbook Network (OTN) through PALSave, and we’d like to invite you to a workshop with OTN’s leadership to learn about developing successful Open Educational Resource (OER) programs on your campus.

The workshop is Monday, March 18, 2019, at Indiana Wesleyan University North Campus.  Register here.

Feel free to email palsave@palni.edu for more information about the workshop or our program.  We hope you can join!

Source: You are invited: PALSave’s Open Textbook Network Workshop, 3/18/19 – PALSave: PALNI Affordable Learning

A Recipe for a Successful Institutional Open Education Initiative – WCET Frontiers

From Rajiv Jhangiani via WCET Frontiers:

Preview:

“I believe in the power of open education to help widen equitable access to education. I believe in using open resources, not only for the financial benefits for students, but also for the impact on teaching and learning.

As an early adopter of open textbooks, I have for years witnessed first-hand the tangible impact of the cost savings on my students’ lives. As an open textbook author, editor, and OER project manager, I have heard from numerous faculty who have taken advantage of the open licensing and built upon my efforts. They have updated, augmented, and adapted the resources available to better serve their students. As an open education researcher, I have investigated the perceptions and impact of OER adoption on students, faculty, and institutions. As an open education scholar, I have published articles, chapters, as well as a book on the subject. As an open education advocate, I have had the privilege of working with over 100 institutions across five continents to help build local capacity and guide their efforts to support this important work.”

Continue reading here:

Source: A Recipe for a Successful Institutional Open Education Initiative – WCET Frontiers

Developing skills for scholarly communication | Jisc scholarly communications

From Helen Blanchett via Jisc scholarly communications:

Preview:

“Over the last 2 years, representatives of several organisations and institutions  with an interest in skills development around scholarly communication have been trying to progress support in this area in a collaborative way (see full list of members below).

Blog posts by Danny Kingsley on the Cambridge Unlocking Research blog (July 2017, Nov 2017) describe initial discussions and early activities around identifying issues to address. These centred around concerns around a lack of training and support for these relatively new roles and a confusion for potential applicants around what these roles actually involve.”

Continue reading here:

Source: Developing skills for scholarly communication | Jisc scholarly communications

Talks Continue Between U California and Elsevier | Inside Higher Ed

From Scott Jaschik via Inside Higher Ed:

Preview:

“Jan. 31 was a deadline set by the University of California System for its negotiations with Elsevier, but the talks continue. The University of California System is engaged in a high-stakes battle with Elsevier, the publishing giant whose contract with the UC system was slated to expire at the end of December 2018. With UC threatening to walk away unless it wins substantial changes in the way Elsevier charges for journal access, many see the showdown as significant. Late in December, UC announced that it agreed with Elsevier on a one-month extension to the contract that is expiring. A university statement said that the extension was part of a “good-faith effort to conclude negotiations by January 31.””

Continue reading here:

Source: Talks Continue Between U California and Elsevier

Public Domain Manifesto | COMMUNIA

From the COMMUNIA group:

“Public Domain, as we understand it, is the wealth of information that is free from the barriers to access or reuse usually associated with copyright protection, either because it is free from any copyright protection or because the right holders have decided to remove these barriers. It is the raw material from which new knowledge is derived and new cultural works are created.

 The Public Domain Manifesto aims at reminding citizens and policy-makers of a common wealth that, since it belongs to all, it is often defended by no-one. In a time where we for the first time in history have the tools to enable direct access to most of our shared culture and knowledge it is important that policy makers and citizens strengthen the legal concept that enables free and unrestricted access and reuse.”

Continue reading here:

Source: Public Domain Manifesto

Learned Publishing : Vol 32 , No 1 | Wiley Online Library

From Learned Publishing:

“In recognition of this 30th year of Learned Publishing, we invited contributions from a wide diversity of contributors who could bring an evidence base and fresh thinking to some of our most dearly held beliefs and current topics of debate.”

Browse the table of contents here:

Source: Learned Publishing : Vol 32 , No 1