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ADD Your Comments to the Digital Preservation Declaration of Shared Values | DuraSpace

From Carol Minton Morris via Duraspace:

The digital preservation landscape is one of a multitude of choices that vary widely in terms of purpose, scale, cost, and complexity. Over the past year a group of collaborating organizations united in the commitment to digital preservation have come together to explore how we can better communicate with each other and assist members of the wider community as they negotiate this complicated landscape. As an initial effort, the group drafted a Digital Preservation Declaration of Shared Values that is now being released for community comment.

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Source: DuraSpace | Open technologies for durable digital content

Open Educational Resources – Babson Survey Research Group

From the Babson Survey Research Group, the third annual report in this series:

Responses from over 2,700 U.S. faculty paint both a “Good news” and a “Bad news” picture for the role of open educational resources (OER) in U.S. higher education.
The levels of awareness of OER, the licensing tied to it, and overall adoption of OER materials, remains low. Only 10% of faculty reported that they were “Very aware” of open educational resources, with 20% saying that they were “Aware.” Faculty continue to report significant barriers to OER adoption. The most serious issues continue to be the effort needed to find and evaluate suitable material.

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Source: Open Educational Resources – Babson Survey Research Group

Copyright in 2018 | Information Today

From Corilee Christou via Information Today:

This year began with a new presidential administration, a new congressional term, and a U.S. Copyright Office without a permanent Register of Copyrights. Several copyright-related legislative proposals were brought forward but not finalized in 2017, and they remain on the legislative calendar for 2018. Here are some predictions from several well-known individuals who are active in the copyright space on what will or will not happen in 2018.

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Source: Copyright in 2018 | Information Today

Open Access: What should the priorities be today? | Open and Shut

From the Open and Shut blog by Richard Poynder:

This year marks the 15th anniversary of the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI), the meeting that led to the launch of the open access movement, and which defined open access thus:

“By ‘open access’ to this literature, we mean its free availability on the public internet, permitting any users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of these articles, crawl them for indexing, pass them as data to software, or use them for any other lawful purpose, without financial, legal, or technical barriers other than those inseparable from gaining access to the internet itself. The only constraint on reproduction and distribution, and the only role for copyright in this domain, should be to give authors control over the integrity of their work and the right to be properly acknowledged and cited.”

A great deal of water has passed under the bridge since 2002, but as 2017 draws to an end what should the stakeholders of scholarly communication be doing now to fully realise the vision outlined at the Budapest meeting? That is a question I have been putting to a number of people, inviting them to say what they believe the priorities should be going forward for the following stakeholders: researchers, research institutions, research funders, politicians and governments, librarians and publishers.

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Source: Open and Shut?: Open Access: What should the priorities be today?

What library publishing looks like in 2017 – Excerpt from the Library Publishing Directory | Library Publishing Coalition

From Melanie Schlosser via the LPC Blog:

Each year, the Directory Committee mines the Directory data set in order to highlight trends and unique aspects of library publishing. In our fifth year, the trends and tendencies pointed out in previous introductions have started to reveal themselves as enduring characteristics and essential features of the library publishing landscape. We believe this reflects both the growing data set and the maturing of the field itself. This introduction highlights that continuity (“The Song Remains the Same”) and draws out two of those essential features for consideration (“Openness” and “Publishing and Pedagogy”).

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Source: What library publishing looks like in 2017 – Excerpt from the Library Publishing Directory | Library Publishing Coalition

OJS is not for sale | Public Knowledge Project

From Kevin at PKP:

With the recent acquisition of bepress by multinational publishing giant Elsevier, we’ve been asked by a number of people, some in jest, others less so, if OJS is next, given its substantial share of the journal platform market. As the title of this piece indicates, OJS is most definitely not for sale.

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Source: OJS is not for sale | Public Knowledge Project

States mandate OER and affordable textbook labeling, but challenges remain | Inside Higher Ed

From Mark Lieberman via Inside Higher Ed:

Four states — California, Oregon, Texas and Washington — have in recent years passed legislation requiring institutions to add labels in course schedules and online registration systems for courses that use free textbooks or open educational resources (OER). Scattered institutions outside those four states have begun this process as well.

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Source: States mandate OER and affordable textbook labeling, but challenges remain

Federal Trade Commission and National Institutes of Health Take Action Against Predatory Publishing Practices – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Rick Anderson via the Scholarly Kitchen:

In an interesting and potentially significant move for the scholarly publishing world, the U.S. District Court for the District of Nevada has granted a preliminary injunction against a major journal publisher and conference organizer in response to a complaint by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). The injunction was granted on the basis of the Court’s analysis of evidence provided by the FTC and its finding that the FTC’s complaint, if allowed to proceed, “is likely to succeed on the merits” and that the public interest would be served by granting it.

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Source: Federal Trade Commission and National Institutes of Health Take Action Against Predatory Publishing Practices – The Scholarly Kitchen

Dec 6: Adjunct Faculty’s Essential Role in OER Adoption and Degrees – CCCOER

A free webinar from CCCOER:

Join us for this webinar to hear how adjunct faculty can participate and be acknowledged for the essential role that they are playing in developing OER degree pathways at many colleges.

Read more and register here:

Source: Dec 6: Adjunct Faculty’s Essential Role in OER Adoption and Degrees – CCCOER

Research and Learning Agenda for Archives, Special, and Distinctive Collections in Research Libraries | OCLC

From Chela Scott Weber, Practitioner Researcher in Residence for the OCLC Research Library Partnership

This research and learning agenda represents the latest in a long line of OCLC Research efforts on behalf of archives and special collections in research libraries, to discern and respond to current and emerging needs in the community, and to convene colleagues across the profession to collectively move the profession forward. It is practitioner focused and represents the results of numerous conversations, reading broadly, and thinking carefully about the most pressing needs that face our collective collections and operations. The agenda addresses areas of inquiry and potential research and learning opportunities, building on recent work in the profession.

Several themes and topical areas of investigation are identified, and the paper presents potential research and learning activities for each of these areas. Ultimately, using this agenda, the RLP will consider where work is already being done in the profession, how OCLC can best leverage its strengths and resources to make the most impact, and where there is interest and energy across the RLP community, in order to discern where it makes most sense for OCLC to focus its efforts.

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Source: Research and Learning Agenda for Archives, Special, and Distinctive Collections in Research Libraries