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Professors Worry About the Cost of Textbooks, but Free Alternatives Pose Their Own Problems – The Chronicle of Higher Education

From Beth McMurtrie via The Chronicle of Higher Education:

“When it comes to textbooks, faculty members have a lot of feelings. Many of them negative. But their thoughts on digital coursework and openly licensed materials aren’t any less conflicted.

These opinions, found in “Freeing the Textbook: Educational Resources in U.S. Higher Education, 2018,” a survey of more than 4,000 faculty members and department chairs released Wednesday, paint a complex picture of a fast-changing landscape, one in which instructors and students have more options about course materials than ever before, yet the best path forward remains unclear.”

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Source: Professors Worry About the Cost of Textbooks, but Free Alternatives Pose Their Own Problems – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Community Code: Supporting the Mission of Open Access and Preservation with the Use of Open Source Library Technologies | Florida State University Libraries

From Keila Zayas-Ruiz and Mark Baggett via Florida State University Libraries:

“As librarians, we serve as champions for equal access and preservation of materials, both scholarly and cultural in significance. One of the core missions of libraries is access. Due to increased demand for scholarly articles and the technological advances of the internet, open access is quickly becoming a major priority among research libraries today. It “has expanded the possibilities for disseminating one’s own research and accessing that of others.” The movement of open access aligns closely with the ALA core value of access as outlined by the ALA council: “All information resources that are provided directly or indirectly by the library, regardless of technology, format, or methods of delivery, should be readily, equally, and equitably accessible to all library users.” It has gained considerable momentum in recent years among librarians in institutions of higher education, spurring funds dedicated to support authors who wish to publish in open access journals, the creation of library-run online open access journals, and open access mandates for faculty members.”

Source: Community Code: Supporting the Mission of Open Access and Preservation with the Use of Open Source Library Technologies | Florida State University Libraries

 

 

For the First Time in More Than 20 Years, Copyrighted Works Will Enter the Public Domain | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian

From Glenn Fleishman via Smithsonian Magazine:

At midnight on New Year’s Eve, all works first published in the United States in 1923 will enter the public domain. It has been 21 years since the last mass expiration of copyright in the U.S.

“That deluge of works includes not just “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” which appeared first in the New Republic in 1923, but hundreds of thousands of books, musical compositions, paintings, poems, photographs and films. After January 1, any record label can issue a dubstep version of the 1923 hit “Yes! We Have No Bananas,” any middle school can produce Theodore Pratt’s stage adaptation of The Picture of Dorian Gray, and any historian can publish Winston Churchill’s The World Crisis with her own extensive annotations. Any artist can create and sell a feminist response to Marcel Duchamp’s seminal Dadaist piece, The Large Glass (The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even) and any filmmaker can remake Cecil B. DeMille’s original The Ten Commandments and post it on YouTube.”

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Source: For the First Time in More Than 20 Years, Copyrighted Works Will Enter the Public Domain | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian

The First Step Towards a System of Open Digital Scholarly Communication Infrastructure – IO: In The Open

From David W. Lewis, Mike Roy, and Katherine Skinner via In the Open

“We are working on a project to map the infrastructure required to support digital scholarly communications.  This project is an outgrowth of David W. Lewis’ “2.5% Commitment” proposal.

Even in the early stages of this effort we have had to confront several uncomfortable truths.”

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Source: The First Step Towards a System of Open Digital Scholarly Communication Infrastructure – IO: In The Open

Draft ACRL Scholarly Communications Research Agenda Feedback Due Jan 4 – ACRL Insider

From Kara Malenfant via ACRL Insider:

“Rebecca Kennison and Nancy Maron, selected by ACRL to design, develop, and deliver a new research agenda for scholarly communications and the research environment, have been hard at work since March 2018 with guidance and input from ACRL’s Research and Scholarly Environment Committee (ReSEC). ACRL is now seeking public comment on a draft document by COB Friday, January 4, 2019.

Developed with a high degree of community involvement—particularly historically underrepresented groups—this powerful new ACRL action-oriented agenda is intended to encourage the community to make the scholarly communications system more open, inclusive, and equitable by addressing issues concerning people, content, and systems. It outlines trends, encourages practical actions, and clearly identifies the most strategic research questions to pursue.”

Source: Draft ACRL Scholarly Communications Research Agenda Feedback Due Jan 4 – ACRL Insider

Regional Collaboration in Promoting OER Adoption – WCET Frontiers

From Jenny Parks, Russ Poulin and Tanya Spilovoy via WCET Frontiers:

“Textbook prices have risen at a higher rate than any other consumer product. Efforts to use Open Educational Resources (OER) have often been limited in scope. How can we take what has been learned and scale it across institutions, systems, and states?

On November 28-30, 2018, seventy delegates from twelve Midwestern states gathered together to learn, share, and create state action plans for the implementation and expansion of the use of open educational resources. The OER Implementation and Policy Summit for the MHEC States was the first multi-state OER meeting of its kind bringing together national advocates and state-appointed delegates from libraries, distance education, systems, legislators, faculty, students, and K-12.”

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Source: Regional Collaboration in Promoting OER Adoption – WCET Frontiers

Elsevier Chairman YS Chi: An Interview – The Scholarly Kitchen

From Roger Schonfeld via the Scholarly Kitchen

“Last week, approximately 180 leaders from scholarly societies, libraries, publishers, and other organizations came together at ITHAKA’s Next Wave conference in New York City. The day’s sessions featured an array of different formats and experts, focusing mostly on fundamental changes facing higher education in the United States, the result of underlying demographics, financial pressures, narrowing political support, and tension around how to define student success. The program also included a number of sessions focused on scholarly publishing and academic libraries. The opening session was an interview, conducted by ITHAKA president Kevin Guthrie of Elsevier’s chairman Youngsuk (“YS”) Chi, with some additional questions from the audience. The interview generated discussion and perspective not only about Elsevier itself, but also about broader changes in scholarly communication and approaches to organizational leadership. I have attempted to reconstruct the interview here from my notes, and Chi and Guthrie have each had a chance to edit and expand their remarks here for the record.”

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Source: Elsevier Chairman YS Chi: An Interview – The Scholarly Kitchen

Confused about copyright? Assessing Researchers’ Comprehension of Copyright Transfer Agreements | JLSC

By Alexandra Kohn and Jessica Lange via the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication:

Abstract:

“INTRODUCTION Academic authors’ confusion about copyright and publisher policy is often cited as a challenge to their effective sharing of their own published research, from having a chilling effect on selfarchiving in institutional and subject repositories, to leading to the posting of versions of articles on social networking sites in contravention of publisher policy and beyond. This study seeks to determine the extent to which authors understand the terms of these policies as expressed in publishers’ copyright transfer agreements (CTAs), taking into account such factors as the authors’ disciplines and publishing experience, as well as the wording and structure of these agreements. METHODS We distributed an online survey experiment to corresponding authors of academic research articles indexed in the Scopus database. Participants were randomly assigned to read one of two copyright transfer agreements and were subsequently asked to answer a series of questions about these agreements to determine their level of comprehension. The survey was sent to 3,154 participants, with 122 responding, representing a 4% response rate. Basic demographic information as well as information about participants’ previous publishing experience was also collected. We analyzed the survey data using Ordinary Least Squared (OLS) regressions and probit regressions. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Participants demonstrated a low rate of understanding of the terms of the CTAs they were asked to read. Participants averaged a score of 33% on the survey, indicating a low comprehension level of author rights. This figure did not vary significantly, regardless of the respondents’ discipline, time in academia, level of experience with publishing, or whether or not they had published previously with the publisher whose CTA they were administered. Results also indicated that participants did equally poorly on the survey regardless of which of the two CTAs they received. However, academic authors do appear to have a greater chance of understanding a CTA when a specific activity is explicitly outlined in the text of the agreement.”

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Source: Confused about copyright? Assessing Researchers’ Comprehension of Copyright Transfer Agreements

The state of the field: An excerpt from the 2019 Library Publishing Directory | Library Publishing Coalition

From Melanie Schlosser via the Library Publishing Coalition:

“As much as we love the searchable online interface for the Library Publishing Directory, it doesn’t include the introduction found in the print, PDF, and EPUB versions. Each year, the Directory‘s introduction includes a ‘state of the field’ based on that year’s data that highlights trends and new developments in library publishing as reported by the programs that contribute their information. To make it easier to find, we are republishing that portion of the introduction here. This year’s introduction was written by Alexandra Hoff, Jessica Kirschner, Janet Swatscheno, and Robert Browder, with an assist from me. Enjoy!”

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Source: The state of the field: An excerpt from the 2019 Library Publishing Directory | Library Publishing Coalition

OER: A Field Guide for Academic Librarians | Pacific University Press

From Wesolek, Lashley, and Langley via Pacific University Press:

“We intend this book to act as a guide writ large for would-be champions of OER, that anyone—called to
action by the example set by our chapter authors—might serve as guides themselves. The following chapters
tap into the deep experience of practitioners who represent a meaningful cross section of higher education
institutions in North America. It is our hope that the examples and discussions presented by our authors will
facilitate connections among practitioners, foster the development of best practices for OER adoption and
creation, and more importantly, lay a foundation for novel, educational excellence.”

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Source: OER: A Field Guide for Academic Librarians | Pacific University Press